College of Humanities & Social Sciences

Dr. Russell Meyer, Dean

Academic Departments Majors Minors
Art Art (BA, BFA) Art
Chicano Studies
English/
Foreign Languages
English (BA)
Foreign language - Spanish (BA)
Creative Writing
English
French
Italian
Spanish
Professional Writing
History/
Political Science/
Philosophy/
Geography
History (BA, BS)
Political Science (BA, BS)
History
Political Science Philosophy
Liberal Studies (BS)
Mass

Mass 

Mass
Communications Communications Communications
And Center For (BA, BS)
New Media
Military Science Military Science
(US Army) ROTC Program
Music Music (BA) Music
Non-Profit Administration
Psychology Psychology Psychology
(BA, BS)
Sociology/ Sociology (BA, BS) Sociology
Anthropology/ Social Science* Anthropology
Social Science (BA, BS) Social Science*
*(Continuing Education only)
Social Work Social Work (BSW)
Women’s Studies

Mission

The mission of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences is to help students develop critical thinking skills, aesthetic awareness, and ethical perspectives, to provide them with the tools and expertise necessary to function as responsible citizens and professionals and to engage in intellectual and artistic pursuits. Faculty members are committed to high quality teaching, theoretical and applied research, scholarship, creativity, to effective service to the University, the profession, and the region, and to the innovative use of technology in these endeavors. The college strives to be a community of learners, teachers, and scholars responsive to the challenges of a diverse society, a vulnerable environment, and an increasingly technological and interdependent world.

Graduation Requirements

In addition to other graduation requirements listed in the catalog, students in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences must complete 18 hours of coursework not counted toward the major field of study or general education.

ART DEPARTMENT

Department Chair: Sonnema
Faculty: Aviña, Dalton, R. Hansen, V. Hansen, Jensen, Johnson

The art curriculum is designed to increase the student’s understanding of art and its relationship to society. The art major prepares the student to be a practicing artist, to enter graduate school for further professional education or to enter the job market in art-related careers. Students also may select art courses as a means of achieving a greater sense of personal creativity and accomplishment. Students, faculty, and invited professional artists display works in the CSU-Pueblo Art Gallery. An active visiting artist program provides contact with successful regional and national professionals.

The major in art leads to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts (BA) and Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA). A minor in art is also available.

Students will need to contact the Art Department for specific major requirements for the Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree.

Department Goals

The art major prepares students to be visually creative individuals with skills in studio processes, knowledgeable in art history, and with experience to enter art-related careers in the job market.

Expected Student Outcomes

General Requirements

  • The art faculty firmly believes that a quality undergraduate art program must be built from the strong foundation of basic concepts and techniques provided by the required ART CORE courses. Art history, drawing and design combined with an introduction to the basic art processes, provide the necessary background of information and skills for individual artistic growth and maturity. A strong grounding in the fundamentals of art, as provided in the ART CORE, indicates the department’s insistence upon respect for and commitment to the academic discipline of art as a professional career.
     
  • Art majors must complete the required courses known as the ART CORE, except Art 410, before proceeding into the beginning courses.
     
  • No grade lower than a C will count toward either an art major or minor.
     
  • Students are required to take 30 hours of major courses in residency

Specific Requirements for the Art Major

ART CORE

ART Courses Titles Credits
ART 110 Art Career Orientation 1
(First Semester)
ART 115 and 116 2D and 3D Design 6
ART 141 and 242 Drawing I & II 6
ART 211 and 212 History of Art I and II 6
ART 234 Painting I
OR
ART 270 Printmaking I 3
ART 247 Ceramics I
OR
ART 233 Sculpture I 3
ART 281 Intro to Graphic Design I
OR
ART 274 Computer Imaging I 3
ART 411 Twentieth Century Art 3
ART 410 Senior Career Orientation 2
(Last Semester)
 __________
TOTAL 33
PLUS
Emphasis area 11
Art electives selected with an art advisor 6
__________
TOTAL 50

Specific Requirements for K-12 Art Education

ART Courses Titles Credits
ART 110 Career Orientation 1
    (1st semester)  
ART 115 2D Design 3
ART 116 3D Design 3
ART 141 Drawing I 3
ART 211 History of Art I (fall) 3
ART 212 History of Art II (spring) 3
ART 234 Painting I 3
ART 242 Drawing II 3
ART 247 Ceramics I 3
ART 250 Fibers & Jewelry for Educators 3
ART 270 Printmaking I 3
ART 276 Photography 3
ART 281 Intro to Graphic Design I 3
ART XXX Upper Division Art History Course 3
ART 410 Senior Career Orientation 3
(last semester)
Art upper division electives (selected with art adv) 8-11
____________
TOTAL 50-53

Specific Requirements for the BFA Degree

Students will need to contact the Art Department for specific major requirements for the Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree.

Specific Requirements for the Art Minor

ART Courses Titles Credits
ART 141 or 242 Drawing I or II 3
ART 115 or 116 2D or 3D Design 3
ART 211 or 212 History of Art I or II 3
Art electives approved by minor advisor 12
      __________
TOTAL 21

Co-curricular requirements

The faculty supports and encourages the involvement of art majors and minors in the Art Club and related activities specific to each studio and actively encourages student participation in such organizations.

Outcomes Assessment Activities

  • Art majors will successfully demonstrate competencies required by the department. Competencies will be evaluated through a portfolio review.
     
  • Each art major is required to produce and maintain a portfolio of work done at CSU-Pueblo as a record of achievement. The contents and objectives of the portfolio will be described, discussed and planned in the career orientation class (Art 110). Final evaluation of the progressive portfolio will take place during the student's last semester as part of the senior orientation class (Art 410).
     
  • The format of the portfolio may vary according to subject matter and content but in general the presentation materials will consist of 35mm color slides, prints, graphic design samples, electronic files, and/or videotapes, as appropriate.
     
  • As a competency indicator of achievements in the area of art history, part of the portfolio should contain samples of a student’s written material as related to art history, analysis and criticism.
     
  • The intent of the portfolio is to faithfully reflect the ability and competency level of the art student as he or she progresses in the program. The makeup of the portfolio will reflect the personal accomplishments of each individual.
     
  • A complete set of course outlines and examination examples for each course will be maintained and updated by faculty members and made available to the student upon request. Class objectives and skills attained during the class will be denoted clearly in these materials.

CHICANO/A STUDIES PROGRAM

The Chicano/a studies minor complements majors and careers in law, sociology, social work, languages, education, government, business and other disciplines. Courses offer unique undergraduate preparation for those who seek entrance to graduate studies in law, humanities or the social sciences.

Students who plan to live and work in the American Southwest or aspire to careers that involve relations in the American continents are likely to be well served by Chicano/a Studies courses. The interdisciplinary approach emphasizes history and cultural studies, and selected courses provide the student with in-depth knowledge of specific aspects of the Chicano/a community.

Program Goals

  • To provide individual courses as well as a minor to fulfill the unique role and mission of Colorado State University-Pueblo.
     
  • To offer an individually designed minor in support of students’ majors.

Expected Student Outcomes

General Requirements

  • Students in Chicano/a studies courses will display an adequate and measurable knowledge of the subject matter within the course.
     
  • Students in Chicano/a studies courses will develop an understanding of the relationships of ethnic groups within American society by viewing the academic study of Chicanos/as as a paradigm for the study of other ethnic groups.
     
  • Students must earn a C- or better in all courses applicable to the minor.

Specific Requirements for the Chicano/a Studies Minor

Twenty-four hours: 15 required, 9 elective. The following five courses are required.

CS Courses Titles Credits
CS 101 Introduction to Chicano/a Studies 3
CS 136 The Southwest United States 3
CS 246 History of Mexico 3
CS 306 La Chicana 3
CS 493 Senior Seminar in Chicano/a Studies 3
Electives 9
__________
TOTAL 24

Electives may be selected from Chicano/a studies courses, several of which are cross-listed with other departments, or by approval of the Chicano/a studies coordinator, from courses in such areas as Spanish, history, psychology, sociology, and social work, among others.

Chicano Studies is also available as an emphasis area within the Spanish major. Please refer to the Spanish Major with Emphasis in Chicano Studies section listed under the Foreign Language section in this Catalog.

CS             Courses Titles Credit
CS/ENG 220 Survey of Chicano/a Literature 3
CS/SW 230 Chicano/a: Social and Psych Study 3
CS/WS 240 Chicana Writers 3
CS 291 Special Topics 1-3
CS 303 Chicano/a Labor History in the U.S. 3
CS/SW 325  Health in the Chicano/a Community 3
CS/WS 401 Third World Feminism 3
CS/HIST 489 Borderlands 3
CS 495 Independent Study 1-3

Outcomes Assessment Activities

  • Upon identification of a Chicano/a studies minor, the Chicano/a studies coordinator will initiate a “Chicano/a studies program” file on the student, with the student’s permission. The file will contain the program of design, the student’s orientation (research interest, general interest, personal interest, employment interest, etc.), a history of the student’s academic progress, the substantive research paper completed in CS 493, a record of meetings with the coordinator, and other examples of the student’s academic performance.
     
  • At three- seven- and 10-year intervals, the graduate will be contacted and asked to evaluate the program’s influence.
     
  • In addition to course syllabi, the Chicano/a studies coordinator will retain a copy of examinations administered in Chicano/a studies courses for a 10-year period. At five-year intervals, the coordinator and the faculty will determine if consistency and academic integrity are being maintained by reviewing instruments of cognitive measurement, student perception forms and trends, alumni comments, and comparative analysis of grade distribution patterns.

ENGLISH/FOREIGN LANGUAGES DEPARTMENT

Department Chair: Sheidley
Faculty: Barber, Cobián, Covi, Frank, Griffin, Kartchner, Keplinger, Rodríguez-Arenas, C. Taylor, T. Taylor

ENGLISH PROGRAM

The major in English leads to a degree of Bachelor of Arts (BA) and provides graduates with an understanding of language and literature as a basis for aesthetic, ethical, social, and academic ways of thinking, creating, and researching. Critical, analytic, and composing skills, which provide excellent preparation for professional careers such as teaching, editing and publishing, business, media, public service, and the arts are emphasized.

Program Goals

Students will become familiar with significant traditions and historical and cultural contexts of literature.

  • Students will become familiar with various theories of literature and various techniques in the analysis and understanding of literature.
     
  • Students will gain aesthetic appreciation of literary works.
     
  • Students will become familiar with the structure, history and functions of language.
     
  • Students will gain proficiency in writing and thinking with clarity, creativity, and accuracy and in analyzing and synthesizing information and ideas.

Expected Student Outcomes

The English faculty believes that grades are valid indicators of a student’s progress and performance; therefore, students must complete, with a grade of C- or better, all courses counting toward the major or minors.

Requirements for the English Major

  • Specific requirements for the English major are listed below. Students should consult with an advisor in English before registration.
     
  • Students must fulfill the University language requirements for the BA degree, first year foreign language (6-10 credit hours) OR English 106 (3 credit hours) and Foreign Language 100 (3 credit hours). For International students, English 101 and 102 fulfill the Foreign Language Requirement.

Requirements for the English Minor

Minor requirements are 20 or more semester credit hours of course work in English numbered 106 or above, of which 12 must be upper division. Courses must be chosen in consultation with an advisor in English.

For teaching endorsement requirements, see the Teacher Education Program section.

Co-curricular Requirements

The English faculty supports and encourages English majors’ involvement in student organizations and participation in tutoring activities in the community and on campus.

Outcomes Assessment Activities

Assessment of the English program is the responsibility of the English Program Assessment Committee, consisting of the chair of English and Foreign Languages and three other faculty members. The committee's annual reports evaluating the program and proposing any needed changes are compiled from the following information:

  • A central file of course syllabi with representative assignments is maintained by the department for inspection by the committee and other qualified persons.
     
  • Faculty advisors monitor each student's progress toward completing major requirements and meeting the Program Goals listed in the catalog. Advisors report any problems or deficiencies in the program encountered by their students to the Program Assessment Committee through the department chair.
     
  • All English majors take a senior-year seminar (English 493) emphasizing professional standards and synthesizing the writing and analytical skills students have acquired in other English classes. All students in English 493 write a senior research paper, one copy of which is submitted to the Program Assessment Committee for review. In order to pass English 493, students must demonstrate satisfactory levels of achievement in the five areas of the program goals.
     
  • The Program Assessment Committee reviews or has reviewed the papers from English 493 on an annual basis and prepares an analysis of what they reveal about the program's success.
     
  • The Program Assessment Committee administers a student-satisfaction questionnaire to all senior English majors each year. A similar questionnaire is sent to recent graduates on a periodic basis.
     
  • The Program Assessment Committee monitors the English curricula at leading comparable institutions and apprises the department of innovations worthy of consideration.

English Major

  • Faculty advisors meet individually with each of their students on a regular basis to help plan schedules and discuss educational and career goals. Advisors maintain an accurate and up-to-date record of each student’s progress towards completion of the requirements for the major.
     
  • All English majors will participate in a senior-year seminar in which all of the writing and analytical skills acquired in other English classes will be synthesized. Students in the class will be expected to complete a senior research project.

Specific Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in English

A total of 45 credits in English beyond 101 and 102 (FL 100 and ENG 106 may be counted, but not double counted for Foreign Language), distributed as follows:

ENG Courses Titles Credits
ENG 201 Intro. to Literary Study 3
(To be taken at or near the start of the program.)
ENG 493 Senior Seminar 3
(To be taken at or near the end of the program)
One of the following courses in Genres: 3
ENG 307 Poetry
ENG 308 Fiction
ENG 309 Drama
   
At least three courses in Literature in Historical Perspective, chosen with the approval of the major advisor, two of which must comprise a sequence of American or British literature at the 200 level (i.e., ENG 210 and ENG 212 or ENG 231 and ENG 232), while the third must be at the 300 level or above. 9
   
At least two courses in Major Writers, at least one of which must be in Shakespeare 6
At least one course in Literary Theory 3
At least one course in Writing, beyond ENG 101 and 102 3
At least one course in The English Language and Linguistics (FL 100 and ENG 106 may be counted, but not double counted for Foreign Language). 3
At least 12 credits of English electives, chosen with the approval of the major advisor (General Education and Foreign Language requirements may not be double counted) 12
__________
TOTAL 45

Specific Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in English with Creative Writing Emphasis

A total of 45 credits in English beyond 101 and 102 (FL 100 and ENG 106 may be counted, but not double counted for Foreign Language), distributed as follows:

ENG Courses Titles Credits
ENG 201 Intro. to Literary Study 3
ENG 114 Intro. to Creative Writing 3
(To be taken at or near the start of the program)
ENG 493 Senior Seminar 3
(To be taken at or near the end of the program)
One of the following courses in Genres: 3
ENG 307 Poetry
ENG 308 Fiction
ENG 309 Drama
At least three courses in Literature in Historical Perspective, chosen with the approval of the major advisor, two of which must comprise a sequence of American or British literature at the 200 level (i.e., ENG 210 and ENG 212 or ENG 231 and ENG 232), while the third must be at the 300 level or above 9
At least two courses in Major Writers, at least one of which must be in Shakespeare 6
At least one course in Literary Theory 3
At least one course in The English Language and Linguistics (FL 100 and ENG 106 may be counted, but not double counted for Foreign Language) 3

Courses in Writing as follows:

Three of the following courses 9
ENG 315 Creative Writing: Poetry
ENG 316 Creative Writing: Fiction
ENG 317 Creative Nonfiction
ENG 318 Creating Writing: Drama
One of the following courses 3
ENG 325 Nature Writing in the West
ENG 414 Advanced Writing Workshop
__________
TOTAL 45

Specific Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in English with Secondary Teaching Endorsement

A total of 41 credits in English beyond 101 and 102 (FL 100 and ENG 106 may be counted, but not double counted for Foreign Language), distributed as follows:

ENG Courses Titles Credits
ENG 201 Intro. to Literary Study 3
(To be taken at or near the start of the program)
ENG 493 Senior Seminar 3
(To be taken at or near the end of the program)
One of the following courses in Genres: 3
ENG 307 Poetry
ENG 308 Fiction
ENG 309 Drama
At least three courses in Literature in Historical Perspective, chosen with the approval of the major advisor, two of which must be the American literature sequence at the 200 level (i.e., ENG 210 and ENG 212), while the third must be outside of American Literature at the 300 level or above 9
At least one course in Major Writers, at least one of which must be in Shakespeare 3
   
At least one course in Literary Theory 3
       
At least two courses in Writing, beyond ENG 101 and 102, one of which must be ENG 303 6
       
All of the following courses  
ENG 352 English Syntax and Usage 3
ENG 412 Literature for Adolescents 2
ENG 452 History of the English Language 3
       
At least 3 credits of English electives, chosen with the approval of the major advisor (General Education and Foreign Language requirements may not be double counted 3
      __________
TOTAL 41

CREATIVE WRITING MINOR

The English department coordinates a minor in creative writing, designed for students who are considering pursuing an MFA in creative writing upon graduation. Since, at the graduate level, the MFA degree specializes in either poetry, playwriting, creative non-fiction, or fiction, students are encouraged to focus on one of the genres. The Creative Writing Minor is also useful for students who intend to continue their creative activity after graduation.

Specific Requirements for the Creative Writing Minor

Courses   Titles Credits
ENG 114 Introduction to Creative Writing 3
One of the following courses 3
ENG 315 Creative Writing: Poetry
ENG 316 Creative Writing: Fiction
ENG 317 Creative Nonfiction
ENG 318 Creative Writing: Drama
One of the following pairs, by genre 6
Poetry
PHIL 102 Philosophical Literature
ENG 414 Advanced Writing Workshop
Fiction
PHIL 102 Philosophical Literature
ENG 414 Advanced Writing Workshop
Creative Nonfiction
ENG 414 Advanced Writing Workshop
ENG 440 Magazine Writing
Playwriting TH 111 Theater Appreciation
ENG 414 Advanced Writing Workshop
At least three of the following courses not used above: 9
ENG 303 Adv. Comp., Rhet., & Gr.
ENG 315 Creative Writing: Poetry
ENG 316 Creative Writing: Fiction
ENG 317 Creative Nonfiction
ENG 318 Creative Writing: Drama
ENG 325 Nature Writing in the West
ENG 352 English Syntax and Usage
ENG 412 Literature for Adolescents
ENG 440 Magazine Writing
FL 100 Introduction to Comparative Linguistics
Honors Seminars: as approved by advisor
MCCNM 233 Script Writing
MCCNM 422 Photojournalism
PHIL 102 Philosophical Literature
PHIL 401 History of Epistemology Seminar
PSYCH 334 Perception
TH 111 Theatre Appreciation
__________
TOTAL 21

PROFESSIONAL WRITING MINOR

The English department coordinates a minor in professional writing, designed to prepare students for work in freelance writing and in editing and publishing, including Web-based publications. The interdisciplinary minor acquaints students with commercial writing markets, desktop publishing, corporate and technical communications, photojournalism, and Web-site design.

Specific Requirements for the Professional Writing Minor

Courses   Titles Credits
ENG 303 Adv. Comp., Rhet., & Gr. 3
ENG/MCCNM 440 Magazine Writing 3
MCCNM 132 Website Design & Development 3
MCCNM 211 Desktop Publishing 3
Select nine credits of electives from the following list of courses: 9
ART 117 Digital Media Basics
ART 276 Photography
ART 281 Introduction to Graphic Design I
ART 381 Introduction to Graphic Design II
BUSAD 270 Business Communications
ENG 305 Tech & Scientific Report Writing
ENG 317 Creative Nonfiction
ENG 452 History of the English Language
MCCNM 240 Public Relations
MCCNM 310 Advanced Desktop Publishing
MCCNM 401 Digital Photographic Procedures
MCCNM 402 Photojournalism
MCCNM 422 Writing for Public Relations
__________
TOTAL 21

FOREIGN LANGUAGES PROGRAM

The Foreign Languages Program offers a Bachelor of Arts in Spanish (BA) intended to prepare students for public school teaching and certification, for admission to graduate school, and for careers in international organizations, government, and business.

Minors in French, Italian, and Spanish complement a wide variety of majors in other disciplines to enhance the students’ ability to compete for jobs where knowledge of a foreign language is desirable.

Courses in German, Russian, and Comparative Linguistics (listed under FL) are offered as permitted by enrollment. Student exchanges with foreign universities are encouraged.

Program Goals for Spanish Majors

Spanish Majors will achieve a level of proficiency in Spanish communication skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) and in the understanding of Hispanic cultures sufficient to allow them to function effectively in careers in teaching, business, the media, government, the arts, etc.

These goals will be achieved by showing proficiency in the 5 C’s:

  1. Communication: The communication standard stresses the use of Spanish for communication in “real life” situations. It emphasizes “what students can do with language” rather than “what they know about language.” Students are asked to communicate in oral and written form, to interpret oral and written messages, to show cultural understanding when they communicate, and to present oral and written information to various audiences for a variety of purposes.
     
  2. Cultures: Cultural understanding is an important part of Spanish language education. Experiencing other cultures develops a better understanding and appreciation of the relationship between languages and other cultures, as well as the student’s native culture. Students become better able to understand other people’s points of view, ways of life, and contributions to the world.
     
  3. Connections: Spanish-language instruction must be connected with other subject areas. Content from other subject areas is integrated with Spanish-language instruction through lessons or courses that are developed around themes common to other subject areas.
     
  4. Comparisons: Students are encouraged to compare and contrast Spanish language and cultures with their own. They discover patterns, make predictions, and analyze similarities and differences across languages and cultures. Students often come to understand their native language and culture better through such comparisons.
     
  5. Communities: Extending learning experiences from the Spanish-language classroom to the home and multilingual and multicultural community emphasizes living in a global society. Activities may include: field trips; use of e-mail and the Internet; participation in clubs, exchange or study-abroad programs, and cultural activities; school-to-work opportunities; and opportunities to hear speakers of Spanish at the University and in the classroom.

Program Goals for Minors in Spanish, French and Italian

Students minoring in French, Italian, and Spanish will be required to demonstrate a level of proficiency sufficient to converse comfortably on everyday topics as well as intermediate levels of proficiency in writing, reading, and culture.

NOTE:

Majors or minors who fail to complete a course with a grade of C- or better are required to repeat the course with a satisfactory grade before proceeding to more advanced offerings.

Placement in the Spanish course sequence:

  1. Students who have taken no Spanish in high school or at another institution of higher learning begin with SPN 101.
     
  2. Students who have taken Spanish in high school, but not at another institution of higher learning, must take a placement exam to determine their proper placement.
     
  3. Heritage Spanish speakers (that is, students who speak Spanish at home to a greater or lesser extent), students with significant Spanish immersion experience, and students who have taken Spanish courses at other institutions of higher learning must meet with a Spanish advisor in order to determine correct placement. The advisor will place the student based on any of the following or a combination thereof: an oral interview, the placement exam, a written composition.

Specific Requirements for the Spanish Major

In addition to the courses listed below, Spanish majors must also meet the following requirements:

  1. A senior project in conjunction with a 400-level SPN course.
     
  2. A second major, minor, or teacher education program.
     
  3. Successful completion of the proficiency exams.
     
  4. At least one upper-division SPN course must emphasize Latin America, one Spain.

Study abroad is strongly encouraged, especially for students planning to teach.

SPN Courses Titles Credits
SPN 101 Beginning Spanish I 3
SPN 102 Beginning Spanish II 3
SPN 201 Intermediate Spanish I 3
SPN 202 Intermediate Spanish II 3
SPN 203 Intermediate Proficiency Building 3
SPN 300 Spanish Phonetics and Phonology 3
SPN 301 Advanced Spanish Grammar 3
Two of the following courses 6
SPN 302 Conv & Comp: Mexico & Central America
SPN 303 Conv & Comp: South America
SPN 304 Conv & Comp: Caribbean
SPN 305 Conv & Comp: Spain
SPN 306 Conv & Comp: United States
And all of the following:
SPN 310 Introduction to Hispanic Literature 3
Three upper-level electives, of which at least two must be 400-level 9
__________
TOTAL 39
   
   
General Education 35
Spanish Major 39
Minor or Teacher Ed 20-37
Electives 9-26
Total 120

Specific Requirements for the Spanish Minor

SPN Courses Titles Credits
SPN 101 Beginning Spanish I 3
SPN 102 Beginning Spanish II 3
SPN 201 Intermediate Spanish I 3
SPN 202 Intermediate Spanish II 3
SPN 203 Intermediate Proficiency Building 3
SPN 300 Spanish Phonetics and Phonology 3
SPN 301 Advanced Spanish Grammar 3
One other 300- or 400-level SPN course 3
__________
TOTAL 24

Specific Requirements for the French Minor

FRN Courses Titles Credits
FRN 101 Beginning Spoken French I 4
FRN 102 Beginning Spoken French II 4
FRN 201 Intermediate French I 4
FRN 202 Intermediate French II 4
French Electives above 300* 7
* (Preferably through foreign exchange program)
__________
TOTAL 23

Specific Requirements for the Italian Minor

ITL Courses Titles Credits
ITL 101 Introduction to Italian I 4
ITL 102 Beginning Spoken Italian II 4
ITL 201 Intermediate Italian I 4
ITL 202 Intermediate Italian II 4
Italian Electives above 300* 7
* (Preferably through foreign exchange program)
__________
TOTAL 23

Outcomes Assessment Activities

Assessment of the foreign languages program is the responsibility of the Foreign Languages Program Assessment Committee, consisting of the chair of English and Foreign Languages and three other faculty members. The committee’s annual reports evaluating the program and proposing any needed changes are compiled from the following information:

  • A central file of course syllabi with representative assignments is maintained by the department for inspection by the committee and other qualified persons.
     
  • Faculty advisors monitor each student’s progress towards completing major requirements and meeting the program goals listed in the catalog. Advisors report any problems or deficiencies in the program encountered by the students to the program assessment committee through the department chair.
     
  • All Spanish majors complete a senior project emphasizing professional standards and sharpening the writing and speaking skills students have acquired in other Spanish courses. All students will be required to submit a copy of their project to the Program Assessment Committee for review.
     
  • An exit exam evaluates proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing as well as their understanding of Hispanic cultures.
     
  • The Program Assessment Committee reviews the senior projects and the results of the exit exam on an annual basis and prepares an analysis of what is revealed about the program’s success.
     
  • The Program Assessment Committee administers a student-satisfaction questionnaire to all senior foreign languages majors and minors each year. A similar questionnaire is sent to recent graduates on a periodic basis.
     
  • The Program Assessment Committee monitors the foreign languages curricula at leading comparable institutions and apprises the department of innovations worthy of consideration.

HISTORY/ POLITICAL SCIENCE/ PHILOSOPHY/GEOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT

Department Chair: B. Spade
Faculty: Berardi, Carter, Harris, Gose, Loats, Matusiak, Rees, Sandoval, Spade,

The programs in history, political science, philosophy, and geography are intended to provide domains of study both for students who desire knowledge for personal enrichment and for students who desire to apply knowledge toward career objectives. Students who major or minor in the fields of the department should expect to develop and refine knowledge of other cultures and the historical and political development of the modern world. Students should also expect to engage in methodical research. Other expectations of students include the ability to prepare rationally cogent papers and the ability to understand political theories, historical movements, and the connections between each.

Departmental programs not only prepare students for occupations in government, business, education, and industry, but also are central to the University’s traditional function of transmitting culture from generation to generation.

HISTORY PROGRAM

The major in history leads to the degree of Bachelor of Arts (BA) or Bachelor of Science (BS) and prepares students for careers in teaching, law, government, and private enterprise, as well as entry into graduate programs.

Program Goals

  • To provide students with a general knowledge of history and historical methodology;
     
  • To prepare students, through training in communication skills and in research methods, to gain knowledge of a given area of history;
     
  • To prepare students to continue personal study and learning about specific subject areas in the discipline on an independent basis;
     
  • To prepare students to engage in critical thinking; and
     
  • To introduce students to the theoretical frameworks that serve as the foundation of historical scholarship.

Expected Student Outcomes

General Requirements

No grade below C- is acceptable in the major or minor.

Core Requirements for the History Major

HIST Courses Titles Credits
HIST 101 World Civilization to 1100 3
HIST 102 World Civilization 1100 to 1800 3
HIST 103 World Civilization since 1800 3
HIST 201 United States History I 3
HIST 202 United States History II 3
HIST 300 Historiography 3
HIST 493 Seminar 3
__________
TOTAL 21

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree in History

Students must complete the “Core Requirements for the History Major” as outlined above, plus 15 hours of history electives. A minimum of two semesters of college level foreign language is required for the BA degree in History; more is recommended. The BA degree in History is appropriate for students planning to attend graduate or law school.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science Degree in History: General Emphasis

Students must complete the “Core Requirement for the History Major” outlined above, plus 21 hours of history electives (at least fifteen hours to be upper level). This emphasis is designed for those students who intend to enter business or government directly after graduation.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science Degree in History: Secondary Education Emphasis

The Secondary Education emphasis for the History Major leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science (BS) and prepares students for teaching at the middle and high school level. Students must complete the “Core Requirements for the History Major” listed above, 15 hours of history electives, the “Social Science Courses Required for Certification” listed below, and all requirements of the Teacher Education Program.

Other Social Science Courses Required for Certification

Courses   Titles Credits
ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
GEOG 101 Physical Geography 3
GEOG 103 World Regional Geography 3
POLSC 101 American National Politics 3
POLSC 102 State and Local Governments 3
__________
TOTAL 15

Specific Requirements for the History Minor

HIST Courses Titles Credits
Nine hours selected from the following courses: 9
HIST 101 World Civilization

3

HIST 102 World Civilization to 1100

3

HIST 103 World Civilization since 1800

3

HIST 201 United States History I

3

HIST 202 United States History II

3

HIST 211 Colorado History

3

PLUS
HIST 300 Historiography 3
History Electives approved by the minor advisor 9
__________
TOTAL 21

Outcomes Assessment Activities

  • Demonstrated proficiency in writing coherent and accurate essays on specific topics within the discipline, as determined by the history faculty.
     
  • Portfolios will be maintained for each student who has declared history as a major or minor. Portfolios will include academic transcripts, major papers written for courses in the discipline, and other pertinent information. The portfolios will be on file in the department office. Updated copies of all course syllabi will be kept in a central file in the department office to enable qualified students to discover how courses are adapted towards program goals.

PRE-LAW

Advisors: Dr. Gayle Berardi and Dr. Beatrice Spade

Although a political science or history major, or minor, is not required, students interested in attending law school should consult the department’s pre-law advisor as early as possible.

POLITICAL SCIENCE PROGRAM

The major in political science leads to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts (BA) and Bachelor of Science (BS), and prepares undergraduates for careers in law, government and politics. Courses in political science also serve to complement the liberal arts core at CSU-Pueblo and to prepare students for acceptance into graduate programs leading to professional degrees in law, public administration, or to specialized academic degrees. Four areas of emphasis are offered in the political science major: public administration and public policy, global studies, American political institutions and politics, and secondary education.

Program Goals

To prepare students majoring in the discipline to:

  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of historical, philosophical and empirical foundations of political science;
     
  • Demonstrate a general command of knowledge about the American political system, global studies, the history of political thought, and standard political science research approaches; and
     
  • Demonstrate an ability to continue personal study and learning on an independent basis about specific subjects in the discipline.

To prepare students minoring in the discipline to:

  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the nature of the discipline; and
     
  • Demonstrate a general knowledge and understanding of the American political system and of global studies.

Expected Student Outcomes

General Requirements

  • Students in the major must complete a minimum of 36 semester credit hours in political science, including 15 hours in the political science core. Students are required to earn a grade of C- or better in all political science courses.
     
  • Students in the minor must complete a minimum of 21 semester credit hours in political science, including 9 semester credit hours in the political science core. Students are required to earn a grade of C- or better in all political science courses.
     
  • A maximum of six credit hours of POLSC 480, Practicum in Politics and Public Service, may be applied towards the 36 hours required for the major, or three credit hours towards the 21 hours required for the minor.
     
  • Depending on individual interests and goals, students are encouraged to take one year of foreign language, courses in statistics, and PHIL 204, Critical Thinking.

Required Core Requirements for the Political Science Major

POLSC Courses Titles Credits
POLSC 101 American National Politics 3
POLSC 202 World Politics 3
POLSC 240 Political Analysis 3
POLSC 370 Political Thought 3
POLSC 493 Seminar 3
__________
TOTAL 15

EMPHASIS AREAS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE

The political science program offers four areas of emphasis: Public Administration and Public Policy; Global Studies; and American Political Institutions and Politics, and Secondary Education The suggested courses for each area are as follows:

Emphasis in Public Administration and Public Policy

Especially appropriate areas for criminal justice, environmental studies, not-for-profit administration and management, and urban and state politics. See a political science advisor for further information.

POLSC Courses Titles Credits
POLSC   Required Core Courses 15
POLSC 102 State and Local Government and Politics 3
POLSC 250 Research Methods in Political Science 3
POLSC 330 Introduction to Public Admin. 3
POLSC 340 Public Policy 3
POLSC 480 Practicum in Politics and Public Service 6
Political Science Elective 3
__________
TOTAL 36

Emphasis in Global Studies

The Global Studies emphasis helps prepare students for a variety of careers, including jobs in the foreign service, national security, the military, international business, international law, and various global health and humanitarian organizations (to mention just a few). In addition, focusing on Global Studies provides an excellent background for graduate study in many disciplines such as international relations, comparative politics, law, business, and national security studies.

POLSC Courses Titles Credits
POLSC Required Core Courses 15
POLSC 201 Comparative Politics 3
Two of the following Area Studies: 6
POLSC 440 Europe
POLSC 445 Latin America
POLSC 450 Asia and the Pacific
POLSC 455 Africa and the Middle East
PLUS
POLSC 480 Practicum in Politics and Public Service 3
Select three courses from the following: 9
POLSC 200 Understanding Human Conflict
POLSC 250 Research Methods in Political Science
POLSC 305 International Relations
POLSC Area Studies Courses (not taken above)
__________
TOTAL 36

Emphasis in American Political Institutions and Politics

Pursuing the emphasis area in American Political Institutions and Politics will prepare students for careers in political campaigning, legislative or administrative service, the law, and public policy development. In addition, the emphasis area will provide the necessary writing and critical thinking skills for graduate and law school.

POLSC   Courses Titles Credits
POLSC   Required Core Courses 15
POLSC 102 State and Local Government and Politics 3
POLSC 480 Practicum in Politics and Public Service 3
Political Science Electives from the following: 15
POLSC 250 Research Methods in Political Science
POLSC 300 Political Parties and Elections
POLSC 320 Legal Research Methods
POLSC 321 American Constitutional Development
POLSC 323 Criminal Law & Procedure
POLSC 324 Family Law
POLSC 340 Public Policy
POLSC 405 The American Presidency
POLSC 411 Legislatures & Legislation
POLSC 473 American Political Thought
__________
TOTAL 36

Emphasis in Secondary Education

The Secondary Education emphasis prepares students for teaching at the middle and high school level. Students must complete the “Core Requirements for the Political Science Major” listed above, 15 hours of political science electives, the “Social Science Courses required for Certification” listed below, and all requirements of the Teacher Education Program.

Other Social Science courses Required for Certification

Courses   Titles Credits
ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
GEOG 101 Physical Geography 3
GEOG 103 World Regional Geography 3
HIST 101 World Civilization to 1100 3
HIST 102 World Civilization from 1100-1800
OR
HIST 103 World Civilization Since 1800 3
HIST 201 U.S. History I 3
HIST 202 U.S. History II 3
__________
TOTAL 21

Specific Requirements for the Political Science Minor

POLSC Courses Titles Credits
POLSC 101 American National Politics 3
POLSC 201 Comparative Politics
OR
POLSC 202 World Politics 3
POLSC 240 Political Analysis 3
Political Science Electives 12
__________
TOTAL 21

Outcomes Assessment Activities

  • Demonstrated proficiency in writing coherent and accurate essays on specific topics within the discipline, as determined by the political science faculty. Portfolios will be prepared for incoming freshmen and/or transfer students with two or more years before graduation. Portfolios will include academic transcripts, major papers written for courses in the discipline, co-curricular data, and other pertinent information. The portfolios will be on file.

PHILOSOPHY PROGRAM

The minor in philosophy complements majors and careers in politics, law, literature, health care, business, technologies, and the liberal arts.

Program Goals

  • To provide individual courses as well as an academic minor in general philosophy;
     
  • To help students understand and appreciate the great ideas from philosophy, to see such ideas in relation to the cultural settings, to develop the abilities to think, speak, and write in a clear, analytical manner, and to allow students to develop a viable philosophy of life.

Expected Student Outcomes

General Requirements

Students who wish to minor in philosophy must complete a minimum of 18 credit hours of approved philosophy courses with grades of C or better.

Specific Requirements for the Philosophy Minor

PHIL Courses Titles Credits
PHIL 102 Philosophical Literature 3
PHIL 201 Classics in Ethics 3
PHIL 204 Critical Reasoning
OR
PHIL 205 Deductive Logic 3
PHIL 293 History of Philosophy Seminar I 3
PHIL 393 History of Philosophy Seminar II 3
PHIL 493 History of Philosophy Seminar III 3
 __________
TOTAL 18

Outcomes Assessment Activities

  • Students must demonstrate proficiency in writing defenses of theses on philosophical topics as determined by the philosophy faculty. A file of representative samples of philosophical writing by students will be retained to document to qualified persons that students are accomplishing the goal of developing the ability to think and write in a clear analytical manner.

GEOGRAPHY

The department extends classes in Geography primarily for students who wish to gain Colorado teacher licensure. There is no major or minor in Geography, but students majoring in a variety of areas would benefit from the Geography classes; e.g., History and Political Science.

LIBERAL STUDIES PROGRAM

Dr. Victoria Marquesen, Coordinator

The Liberal Studies major, which leads to a B.S. degree, is intended to provide a strong liberal arts education for future elementary education teachers. Core requirements build upon students’ experiences in General Education to provide both breadth and depth in the arts and humanities, English, math, sciences, and social sciences. Required courses provide support in each area of the Colorado K-6 Model Content Standards. Students are required to select an area of concentration or emphasis for an additional 12 hours of study. Areas of concentration may be chosen from Art, English, Health, History, Language and Linguistics, Leadership, Math, Modern Foreign Languages, Music, Political Science, Psychology, Science, and Sociology.

This degree is approved for students in Elementary Education. Students completing the Liberal Studies major are required to minor in Education.

Program Goals

At CSU-Pueblo, teacher education is a campus wide responsibility, and overall program goals reflect components of both the Liberal Studies major and Education minor. It is the purpose of the Liberal Studies major to assure that students will develop breadth and depth of knowledge of the liberal arts, and it is the responsibility of the Education minor to assure students become proficient at transforming this knowledge into curriculum and instruction for young children.

It is the joint responsibility of both the major and minor to prepare future teachers to evaluate information critically, to study and research independently, and to communicate knowledge effectively. The following four program goals have been established for the Liberal Studies Degree. Goal 1 is largely the responsibility of the Liberal Studies major and Goal 4 the responsibility of the Elementary Education minor; benchmarks for Goals 2 and 3 have been designed across the entire degree program.

1.        Acquisition of Knowledge. Graduates are broadly educated in the liberal arts
           and sciences:

  • Understanding the significant ideas, concepts, structures and values within disciplines, including theoretical, ethical, and practical implications.
     
  • Mastering content knowledge in all areas taught in elementary schools: the arts, math literature and language, social sciences, sciences, and human development and learning.
     
  • Balancing a breadth of knowledge in the liberal arts and sciences with depth of knowledge within a discipline.

2.        Construction of Knowledge. Graduates demonstrate habits of thinking, including
           analytical skills, independent thinking, reasoned judgment, mature values, and
           imagination:

  • Utilizing the tools of inquiry of the humanities, arts, mathematics, and behavioral, social, and natural sciences to understand and evaluate ideas.
     
  • Developing habits of critical intellectual inquiry, including self-direction and self-reflection.
     
  • Making connections from different intellectual perspectives and multiple viewpoints to form cross-disciplinary connections.
     
  • Utilizing research skills of the liberal arts and sciences, including library and data retrieval skills, to study and evaluate information.

3.         Communication of Knowledge. Graduates communicate effectively:

  • Writing clearly in a variety of academic and practical formats.
     
  • Speaking effectively in a variety of settings.
     
  • Utilizing technology as a tool to inform and communicate.

4.         Application of Knowledge. Graduates create standards-based learning
            experiences that make knowledge accessible, exciting, and meaningful for all
            students:

  • Using multiple representations and explanations of disciplinary concepts that capture key ideas and link them to students’ prior understandings.
     
  • Using different viewpoints, theories, “ways of knowing,’ and methods of inquiry in teaching of subject matter content.
     
  • Evaluating curriculum for their comprehensiveness, accuracy, and usefulness for representing particular ideas and concepts.
     
  • Engaging students in generating knowledge and testing hypotheses according to the methods of inquiry and standards of evidence used in the discipline
     
  • Developing and using curricula that encourage students to see and interpret ideas from diverse perspectives.
     
  • Creating interdisciplinary learning experiences that allow inquiry from several subject areas.

Program Design

The program is planned as a coherent whole, with four components:

  1. General Education 

    Specific General Education courses form the foundation of knowledge for all students with this major. These courses fulfill CSU-Pueblo graduation requirements and are essential to meet many of the content standards for elementary teachers. Courses in the arts and humanities, English, math, history, sciences, and social sciences contribute to the General Education core.
     
  2. Liberal Studies Core

    Liberal Studies Core requirements build upon students’ experiences in General Education to provide both breadth and depth to the program to meet program goals. Emphasis is placed on each area relative to K-6 content standards to assure depth of knowledge in the humanities, social sciences, math, and sciences.
     
  3. Liberal Studies Area of Emphasis in a Specific Discipline:

    Students are required to select an area of concentration or emphasis and, in consultation with an advisor, develop a plan for study for an additional 12 hours in Liberal Studies. The plan should include goals to be achieved by the concentration and the sequence of courses to achieve the goals. Areas of concentration may be chosen from art, English, health, history, language and linguistics, math, modern foreign languages, music, political science, psychology, science, and sociology. Elementary Education has special requirements for admission and retention. Please refer to the section in the catalog for this information.
     
  4. Education Minor

    All students must complete a minor in Education. The Education minor, which has been developed to coordinate with the major, requires completion of 37 credit hours. Education has special requirements for admission and retention. Please refer to the section in the catalog for this information.

Program Assessment

Assessment will be ongoing, with evaluations at three check points (admission to education, admission to student teaching, and program completion), as well as follow-up assessments at the end of one year after program completion. Student outcomes will be evaluated through, a) formal assessments at the sophomore (e.g., Academic Profile) and senior level (PRAXIS Elementary Education Content Exam), b) faculty recommendations of student progress, c) portfolio assessment, and d) assessment of the application of knowledge in students’ field experiences and student teaching. The contents of the electronic portfolio required of all students will include representative work from courses, as well as student-directed evaluations of progress.

The Teacher Education Board, consisting of faculty from each Liberal Studies discipline, will have primary responsibility for evaluation of the program; and the Associate Dean for Education will assume responsibility for gathering program evaluation information and reporting to the Board.

Requirements For The Liberal Studies Major

Requirements for admission and retention in teacher education are included in the description of the Teacher Education Program in this catalog and in the Teacher Education Handbook.

Students must receive a grade of C- or greater in all courses listed as requirements; a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.500 in the major is required for admission to student teaching.

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

General Education Skill Requirements

Courses   Titles Credits
ENG 101 English Composition I 3
ENG 102 English Composition II 3
MATH 156 Introduction to Statistics 3

General Education Knowledge Requirements

Courses Titles Credits
BIOL 100 Principles of Biology 3
BIOL 100L Principles of Biology Lab 1
ENG 130 Introduction to Literature 3
GEOG 103 World Regional Geography 3
GEOL 101 Earth Science 3
GEOL 101L Earth Science Lab 1
PSYCH 151 Human Development 3
SPCOM 103 Speaking and Listening 3
One of the following: 3
ART 100 Visual Dynamics 3
MUS 118 Music Appreciation 3
TH 111 Theatre Appreciation 3
One of the following: 3
HIST 101 World Civilization to 1100 3
HIST 102 World Civilization from 1100 to 1800 3
HIST 103 World Civilization since 1800 3

Students are not allowed to count the same courses completed for general education requirements as course requirements in the Liberal Studies major, including those in concentrations.

Total General Education Required 35

LIBERAL STUDIES CORE REQUIREMENTS

Courses   Titles Credits
ENGLISH (8 hours)
ENG 351 Children’s Literature 2
ENG 303 Advanced Composition, Rhetoric and Grammar 3
One Upper Division Literature Course 3
FINE ARTS (3 hours)
One of the following (not completed for General Education): 3
ART 100 Visual Dynamics 3
MUS 118 Music Appreciation 3
TH 111 Theatre Appreciation 3
MATH (9 hours)
MATH 360 Elem. Concepts of Mathematics I 3
MATH 361 Elem. Concepts of Mathematics II 3
MATH 362 Problem Solving for Elementary Teachers 3
SCIENCE (4 hours)
PHYS 150/  
CHEM 150 Elementary Concepts in Physics and Chemistry 4
SOCIAL SCIENCE (9 hours)
POLSC 101 American National Politics 3
PSYCH 342 Educational Psychology 3
One of the following: 3
HIST 201 U.S. History I 3
HIST 202 U.S. History II 3
       
Total Core Requirements 33

REQUIRED CONCENTRATION IN DISCIPLINE AREA (12 HOURS)

Students are required to select one of the following concentration areas of 12 hours. All students should meet with an advisor in the area of concentration and develop the goals to be achieved by completion of the concentration and the sequence of courses to achieve the goals.

ART
ART 211/or
212 History of Art I/II 3
Studio Art Course 3
Art courses numbered 300 or above 6
ENGLISH  
ENG 201 Introduction to Literary Study 3
9 hours, 3 hours of which must be in courses Numbered 300 or above 9
HEALTH
EXHP 162/L Personal Health/Lab 4
EXHP 201 Drugs & Healthy Lifestyles 3
EXHP 232 First Aid 2
EXHP 382 Lifestyle Disease Risk Reduction 3
HISTORY
HIST 201/or
202 U.S. History I/II (whichever class not completed in core 3
HIST 300 Historiography 3
History courses numbered 300 or above 6
LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS
ANTHR 106 Language Thought & Culture 3
ENG 352 English Syntax and Usage 3
FL 100 Intro to Comparative Linguistics 3
SPCOM 260 Language Acquisition and Linguistics 3
LEADERSHIP
US 160 Introduction to Leadership 3
US 260 Leadership in Service Organizations 3
US 360 Applied Leadership 3
US 460 Working with Experienced Leaders 3
(Prerequisite: Acceptance into President’s Leadership Program)
MATH
MATH 126 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 5
MATH 207 Matrix and Vector Algebra 2
MATH 224 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 5

MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGE
All students will be required to complete a Placement Test to determine the level at which they will begin a language. Twelve hours in the language will be planned with a language faculty advisor. For students placed in the first level of the language, 12-hour concentrations are listed below.

 

FRENCH
FRN 101 Beginning Spoken French I 4
FRN 102 Beginning Spoken French II 4
FRN 201 Intermediate French I 4
ITALIAN
ITL 101 Introduction to Italian I 4
ITL 102 Introduction to Italian II 4
ITL 201 Intermediate Italian I 4
SPANISH  
SPN 101 Beginning Spanish I 3
SPN 102 Beginning Spanish II 3
SPN 201 Intermediate Spanish I 3
SPN 202 Intermediate Spanish II 3
MUSIC
MUS 100 Music Fundamentals I: Notation 2
MUS 105 Music Fundamentals II: Foundations 2
MUS 118 Music Appreciation (if taken as core course, 3 elective hours may be taken 3
MUS 127 Functional Piano Class 1
MUS 160-179 Applied Lesson 2
VARIES Music Ensemble 2
MUS 101 Music Performance Symposium I 0
POLITICAL SCIENCE
POLSC 240 Political Analysis 3
POLSC courses numbered 300 or above 9
PSYCHOLOGY
PSYCH 251 Infancy, Childhood, and Preadolescence 3
9 hours from the following 9
PSYCH 220 Drugs & Behavior 3
PSYCH 231 Marriage & Family Relationships 3
PSYCH 311 Theories of Personality 3
PSYCH 336 Learning 3
PSYCH 337 Memory & Cognition 3
PSYCH 352 Social Psychology 3
PSYCH 353 Advanced Developmental Psychology 3
PSYCH 362 Abnormal Psychology 3
PSYCH 463 Psychopathology of Childhood 3
PSYCH 465 Behavior Modification 3
SCIENCE
One Biology, One Chemistry, and One Physics Course and Labs; examples include:
BIOL 121/L Environmental Conservation/Lab 4
BIOL 191/L College Biology I/Botany/Lab 5
BIOL 206/L Intro to Microbiology /Lab 4
CHEM 101/L Chemistry and Society/Lab 4
CHEM 111/L Principles of Chemistry/Lab 4
CHEM 121L General Chemistry/Lab 5
PHYS 110/L Astronomy/Lab 4
PHYS 140/L Light, Energy, and the Atom 4
PHYS 201/L Principles of Physics I/Lab 4
PHYS 221/L General Physics I/Lab 5
SOCIOLOGY
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3
9 hours from the following; 6 must be upper division 9
SOC 105 Understanding Human Diversity 3
SOC 155 Minority and Ethnic Relations 3
SOC 201 Social Problems 3
SOC 206 Gender and Society 3
SOC 231 Marriage and Family Relationships 3
SOC 306 Delinquency and Juvenile Justice 3
SOC 308 Popular Culture 3
SOC 354 Urban Sociology 3
SOC 355 Political Sociology 3
SOC 356 Social Stratification 3
SOC 403 Human Sexuality and Social Behavior 3
SOC 404 Poverty 3
SOC 407 Family Violence 3
Required Concentration in Discipline Area 12
(See concentrations listed above)
       
Elementary Education Requirements 40
       
       
PROGRAM REQUIREMENT TOTAL 120

MASS COMMUNICATIONS DEPARTMENT AND CENTER FOR NEW MEDIA

Department Chair: Jennifer Mullen
Faculty: Ebersole, Joyce, Lovato, Mullen, Orman, Steffen

KTSC-FM Manager: Matt Garbiso

The Mass Communications Department and Center for New Media supports the mission of the University by offering an applied major in which technological innovation is grounded in a traditional humanities and social sciences curriculum. Students are prepared for careers in the media and related disciplines while also being given the ethical and aesthetic foundations to make those careers meaningful.

The major in Mass Communications leads to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts (BA) and Bachelor of Science (BS). A degree in Mass Communications leads to careers in journalism reporting and editing for news, features and sports; advertising copywriting, design and sales; digital video and audio production for radio, television, and the Internet; interactive multi-media application for the Internet; and strategic public relations for government, nonprofits, and business.

Emphasis areas require 21 additional credit hours of course work beyond the mandatory 21-credit hour core for completion of the major. Selected professional courses may have course specific fees. Please consult your advisor.

The TODAY, the University’s newspaper, is published as a laboratory tool of the Mass Communications department. The newspaper serves the students, faculty and staff of CSU-Pueblo in addition to the Pueblo community. Editorial and management positions are awarded each semester after review of all applications from qualified students. The newspaper is funded through advertising revenue. The newspaper’s advisor is a member of the Mass Communications faculty. Prerequisites: MCCNM 201 and declared major or minor.

KTSC-FM is licensed to CSU-Pueblo as an educational radio station by the Federal Communications Commission. Operated by the Mass Communications department, the 10,000-watt station serves a 50-mile radius of the campus. Advanced Mass Communications students are involved in daily programming, production, and news. Prerequisites: Declared major or minor in Mass Communications, MCCNM 141 and 150.

KTSC-TV, a Public Broadcasting full-power station affiliated with Rocky Mountain Public Broadcasting and CPB, provides laboratory training and on-campus labs for television students in the KTSC Studio. Prerequisites: Declared major or minor in Mass Communications, MCCNM 142.

The Center for New Media is a cooperative effort between CSU-Pueblo and Pueblo Community College. As such, the Center provides additional resources and experiences for students, including opportunities to work in field production with a digital, six-camera production truck and advanced computer laboratories.

Department Goal

The primary goal of the Mass Communications Department/Center for New Media is to offer a pragmatic and professionally oriented program aimed at preparing majors for successful careers in the media and related areas and to prepare students for graduate study.

Expected Student Outcomes

General Requirements

  • Majors are required to specialize in one of five emphasis areas offered by the department:

          - Advertising
          - Broadcasting (TV and Radio Production)
          - New Media Studies
          - News Editorial-Journalism
          - Public Relations
     
  • Successful Mass Communications majors will demonstrate sufficient knowledge, comprehension and analytical skills by the ability to evaluate specific communication events in the proper context of their emphasis area.
     
  • Each faculty member will keep, in the department’s central file, a set of course outlines or syllabi that list the objectives and skills achieved during the semester. This central pool of materials describes the detailed expectations and accountability elements for the Mass Communications/Center for New Media major on a course-by-course basis.
     
  • Writing skills are foundational for the entire program of Mass Communications/Center for New Media at CSU-Pueblo. Students are required to maintain a minimum grade-point average of 2.500. Basic core courses must be satisfactorily completed before advanced work in an emphasis area will be encouraged.
     
  • Consistent with general CSU-Pueblo policy, no student enrolled in Mass Communications/Center for New Media courses may accumulate unexcused absences, or arrive late for scheduled classes without faculty consultation.
     
  • The Mass Communications department believes that grades are valid quantitative indicators of student performance. Students’ GPAs in the major or minor will be used by emphasis area advisers for both formative and summary evaluations of majors and minors.
     
  • Students graduating with either a BA or BS degree must achieve a total grade-point average of 2.500 within the major. The GPA will be calculated on all courses with the MCCNM prefix appearing on the student’s transcript.
     
  • Students graduating from the University and majoring in Mass Communications/Center for New Media should pass all MCCNM courses with a grade of C or better, but students will not be required to repeat D grades as long as the 2.500 MCCNM grade point average is achieved.
     
  • While it is necessary for Mass Communications/ Center for New Media majors and minors to meet the minimum GPA standards set by the department and the University, it is expected that graduates will exceed these standards.

The Mass Communications/Center for New Media Major:

Specific Requirements for the Mass Communications/Center for New Media Major Core

MCCNM Courses Titles Credits
MCCNM 101 Media and Society 3
MCCNM 102 Introduction to Electronic Media. 3
MCCNM 201 News Writing 3
MCCNM 216 Advertising 3
MCCNM 240 Public Relations 3
MCCNM 411 Media Law 3
MCCNM 493 Mass Media Seminar 3
__________
TOTAL 21

Specific Requirements for the Emphasis in Advertising: Patricia Bowie Orman, adviser

MCCNM Courses Titles Credits
MCCNM 302 Advertising Writing 3
MCCNM 350 Media Lab 1-3
MCCNM 425 Audience Research Methods 3
MCCNM 430 Integrated Comm. Campaigns 3
MKTG 340 Principles of Marketing 3
MCCNM   Electives 6-8
_____________________
TOTAL 21 + 21 Core = 42

Specific Requirements for the Emphasis in Broadcasting: Sam Lovato, adviser

MCCNM Courses Titles Credits
MCCNM 141 Digital Audio Production. 3
MCCNM 142 Digital Video Production and Operation. 3
MCCNM 150 Regulation of Telecomm 3
MCCNM 233 Script Writing 3
MCCNM 320 Broadcast Station Programming 3
MCCNM 350 Advanced Media Lab 3
MCCNM Elective (Radio or TV) 3
_____________________
TOTAL 21 + 21 Core = 42

Specific Requirements for the Emphasis in Public Relations: Jennifer Mullen, adviser

MCCNM Courses Titles Credits
MCCNM 202 Feature Writing 3
MCCNM 311 Copy Editing 3
MCCNM 321 PR Case Problems 3
MCCNM 422 Writing for Public Relations 3
MCCNM 430  Integrated Comm. Campaigns 3
MCCNM 425 Audience Research Methods 3
MCCNM   Electives 3
_____________________
TOTAL 21 + 21 Core = 42

Specific Requirements for the Emphasis in New Media Studies: Sam Ebersole, adviser

MCCNM Courses Titles Credits
MCCNM 132 Web Site Design and Dev 3
MCCNM 141 Digital Audio Production 3
MCCNM 142 Digital Video Production and Operations 3
MCCNM 238 Multimedia Applications 3
MCCNM 336 Interactive Media and Interface 3
MCCNM 382 Digital Media Post Production 3
MCCNM Elective 3
_____________________
TOTAL 21 + 21 Core = 42

Specific Requirements for the Emphasis in News-Editorial Journalism: Richard Joyce, Leticia Steffen, advisers

MCCNM Courses Titles Credits
MCCNM 202 Feature Writing 3
MCCNM 211 Desktop Publishing 3
MCCNM 305 News Reporting 3
MCCNM 311 Copy Editing 3
MCCNM 350 Media Lab 1-3
MCCNM 445 Reporting Public Affairs 3
MCCNM Electives 3-5
_____________________
TOTAL 21 + 21 Core = 42

Co-curricular Requirements

  1. The thrust of the Mass Communications Department/Center for New Media is pragmatic, therefore, all students are encouraged to be involved in opportunities provided by participation in the following media labs:
    • Desktop Publishing and design
    • TODAY newspaper: News Editorial and Advertising
    • KTSC-FM (on-campus radio station)
    • KTSC-TV (on campus PBS affiliated station)
    • CNM Productions (remote production truck)

    The media labs provide the necessary entry to strongly suggested field experience programs. Field placements are not required, but students may earn up to eight credit hours in such internships. Internships are awarded at the discretion of the adviser.
     
  2. In addition, Mass Communications/Center for New Media majors and minors are encouraged to join and participate in additional co-curricular activities on campus and through community and University projects.

Specific Requirements for the Mass Communications/Center for New Media Minor

Students desiring a minor in Mass Communications/ Center for New Media must complete 21-credit hours approved by their minor area advisor and MUST include MCCNM 101 and 201. The minor may not include more than 3 credits of laboratory work and must include at least 6 hours of upper division course work.

Outcomes Assessment Activities

Student success is measured through a variety of methods that include classroom writing samples, portfolios of student work, professional internship evaluations, exit interviews, student employment upon graduation, and alumni feedback.

Each major or minor is encouraged to maintain an academic portfolio of all salient work or projects completed while in the department. Department faculty will review and evaluate a selection of portfolios in the spring of each year to track student progress. Each emphasis area adviser also maintains a file.

The Mass Communications Department/Center for New Media insists that the academic portfolio demonstrate a pattern of sustained academic growth and development of the major and minor, appropriate to the student's emphasis area.

The academic portfolio should reflect the quality and level of intellectual and scholarly work undertaken by the student while in the department, relative to the qualitative, quantitative, ethical, legal and aesthetic dimensions of the field. The appropriateness of the content is dictated by the student's emphasis area and is prescribed by the individual's advisor.

A student may be required to participate in an exit interview during his or her final semester. Students are selected on a random basis from enrollments in the department's capstone course, Mass Media Seminar.

MILITARY SCIENCE (US ARMY)
(Reserve Officers’ Training Corps Program)

Professor of Military Science: Lieutenant Colonel Kathy Ensworth; Assistant Professors of Military Science: Major Greg Cyr, Senior Military Science Instructors: Sergeant First Class Gener Molina, Sergeant First Class Steven Ruterbories

The Army ROTC Program

The focus of this program is to recruit, develop, and commission college-educated men and women to serve in the United States Army. Participants in the program are commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the Army upon graduation with a bachelor’s degree. They will be expected to serve in either the active Army or in the Reserve Components (Army Reserves or Army National Guard) after commissioning.

The program is centered on teaching the principles of leadership. These principles can be applied to positions in the military or in civilian careers. All courses of instruction are designed to develop leadership and management skills as well as enhance the self-confidence and initiative of each student.

Military Science is taken in addition to the required courses for each student’s major.

ROTC is a four-year program that is divided into two phases: the Basic Course and the Advanced Course.

A minor in Military Science is available for qualified students.

The Basic Course

The focus for these lower division courses (MSL 100/200 courses) is to lay a foundation for more advanced instruction in the skills needed to be a successful leader. Students may participate even if they do not plan on receiving a commission in order to gain experience in leadership and management.

This phase is open to all qualified students (generally freshmen and sophomores). Students should be aware that there are some physical requirements for successful course completion.

There is no military obligation for participation in the Basic Course unless a student is receiving an Army ROTC Scholarship.

Sophomores wanting to complete the Basic Course requirements so that they may enter the Advanced Course can compress the Basic Course and/or attend the Leader’s Training Course during the summer between their sophomore and junior years. For further information please see below and contact the Department of Military Science.

The Advanced Course

The Advanced Course (MSL 300/400 level courses) is oriented to preparing students (juniors and seniors) who have successfully completed the basic course requirements with the skills and knowledge necessary to be commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the Army. The focus of the Advanced Course continues on building leadership skills and abilities.

Students participating in the Advanced Course have a contractual obligation to complete the program and enter the Army upon graduation.

Students must have a minimum of four semesters remaining in their course work before graduation to participate in the Advanced Course and they must be in a full-time status (12 credit hours per semester) during each of those semesters.

Credit for the Basic Course for entry into the Advanced Course may be achieved in a number of ways. The normal progression is to successfully complete all four Basic Course Military Science classes (MSL 101, 102, 201 and 202) with a grade of “C” or better. Students can also enter the course laterally by receiving credit for one of the following:

  • Prior enlisted service in the Army, Air Force, Navy or Marines Participation of a minimum of three years in a JROTC program
     
  • At least one year as a service academy cadet
     
  • Successful completion of the Army ROTC Leaders Training Course (LTC). This training is available to students who did not have the opportunity to participate in any of the above programs. The five-week camp is conducted every summer at Fort Knox, KY. Participants receive pay while attending. The Army pays travel and some other expenses. Students who participate will be required to contract before attending. For more information contact the Department of Military Science.
     

Students participating in the Advance Course will be required to attend the Leadership Development and Assessment Course (Advanced Camp) which is conducted annually at Fort Lewis, Washington. This course is normally attended during the summer between a student’s junior and senior year. It is a 32-day event that provides the best professional training and evaluation for all students participating in ROTC before commissioning. The course mission includes continued military training and leadership development, but the primary focus is to evaluate each student’s officer potential. This course represents the only opportunity in ROTC to gather all qualified students from across the nation on one “level playing field” for the purpose of making those assessments. Successful completion of the course is mandatory for commissioning

Course Offerings

Basic Course
Courses   Titles Credits
MSL 101 Leadership & Personal Development (F) 1
MSL 102 Introduction to Tactical Leadership (S) 1
MSL 201 Innovative Team Leadership (F) 2
MSL 202 Foundations of Tactical Leadership (S) 2
Advanced Course
Courses Titles Credits
MSL 301 Adaptive Tactical Leadership (F) 3
MSL 302 Leadership in Changing Environments (S) 3
MSL 303 Advanced Camp (SS) 6
MSL 401 Developing Adaptive Leaders (F) 3
MSL 402 Leadership in a Complex World (S) 3
MSL 485 Special Studies in Leadership (F,S) 3

The Military Science Minor

A minor in Military Science is available for students participating in the Army ROTC Program. Participants must achieve a minimum of 21 credit hours by graduation, which includes credit for all Advanced Course classes (to include graduation from Advanced Camp) and the Professional Military Education (PME) requirement. More information about the minor is available through the Department of Military Science.

Professional Military Education (PME) Requirements

To receive a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army and to graduate with a Minor in Military Science students must also complete a course in the following area to receive credit for their Professional Military Education (PME) requirements. Further information on this requirement will be provided to the students during contracting into the Army ROTC program.

  • Military History

Scholarship Information

The Army ROTC Scholarship Program provides financial assistance for the education and training of highly motivated men and women who desire to pursue careers as commissioned officers in the U.S. Army after graduation with a bachelor’s degree. Four, three- and two-year scholarships are available to qualified candidates. The scholarship pays for school tuition, books, certain fees, and provides the student with a monthly, tax-free stipend of between $250 and $400 per month for up to 10 months per year. (depending on academic status). For more information pertaining to scholarships and enrollment eligibility please contact the Department of Military Science at 549-2141.

MUSIC DEPARTMENT

Department Chair: Hudson
Faculty: Barto, B. Beck, Cantu, Chi, Crafts, Creager, Duncan, Eastin, Eberhardt, Hollingsworth, Ihm, Markowski, Neihof, Peters, Rann, Reid, Soper, A. Turner, J. Turner, Veronika String Quartet (Afanassieva, Dobrotvorskaia, Garibova, Guideri)

The Music Department of Colorado State University-Pueblo seeks to promote excellence in musicianship and to equip students for a career in music. The major in music leads to a degree of Bachelor of Arts (BA).

Mission, Goals and Objectives

The mission of the Department of Music at Colorado State University-Pueblo is to prepare undergraduate students to function professionally in their chosen field of music within the larger context of a liberal education, to provide artistic enrichment for the community, and to serve as an artistic resource.

The goals of the Department of Music are:

  • To prepare students to function professionally in their field of music,
     
  • To provide appropriate musical experiences for students in the liberal arts program,
     
  • To prepare students to pursue advanced study in their respective areas,
     
  • To encourage in all students the development of musical sensitivity and an understanding of the aesthetic process,
     
  • To provide for the University and community the enrichment afforded by a variety of musical experiences.

The objectives of the Department of Music used to accomplish the goals outlined above include:

  • To offer courses and related experiences of an appropriate nature and quality and of sufficient breadth to allow the student adequate opportunity to acquire the necessary knowledge and skills.
     
  • To offer and encourage student participation in a variety of ensembles and other instructional opportunities, allowing for varying musical tastes, experiences, and abilities,
     
  • To sufficiently challenge each music student to progress beyond the minimum requirements of a degree program, and to provide opportunities for growth beyond classroom instruction,
     
  • To present music in a manner that promotes it as an art form,
     
  • To offer and promote quality performance and instruction, and to serve as an artistic resource.
Requirements

GPA

Students are required to complete all major and minor courses with a grade of C or better and to maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better.

Minor Area

The ability to think across disciplines contributes significantly to the educational experience. Music majors must successfully complete an approved minor or a minimum of 18 hours in subject areas other than music with a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better. For the music education degree, education is the appropriate minor.

Performance Skills

The attainment of an appropriate level of performance skills is required in order to function successfully as a musician. The minimum Performance Standards, which appear on the music department’s web site and in the music department student handbook, provide representative examples of music literature and repertoire and must be successfully completed for each of the musical areas of performance concentration.

Admission to Upper Division

All music majors must qualify for admission to Upper Division (junior-level) study leading to the specific degree by successfully completing the Junior Qualifying Exam at the end of their sophomore year. In addition, all music majors will be required to complete successfully the piano proficiency requirement. See the Department of Music Student Handbook for specific information regarding these evaluations.

Standards

Knowledge of specific subject areas, as recommended by the National Association of Schools of Music in music education, music theory, music history, music technology, and music performance will be measured through outcomes-testing.

Degree in Music

The Bachelor of Arts in Music provides a broad base for a number of careers in music such as private studio teachers, and is intended as preparation for advanced graduate study.

The Bachelor of Arts in Music: Music Performance emphasis is appropriate for those students who plan to perform, teach privately, or pursue further study at the graduate level.

The Bachelor of Arts in Music: Music Education emphasis is a professional degree and provides the essential training, knowledge and skills necessary for a teaching career in choral, instrumental, or general music. The degree leads to K-12 music teacher licensure.

The University also offers a Minor in Music which allows the student to further their knowledge of music as an art while enjoying participation in music performance.

Specific Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in Music

General Education 35

NOTE: must include MUS 118, Music Appreciation. In addition, all students must participate in appropriate Primary and Secondary ensembles as assigned each semester, excepting when Student Teaching.

Bachelor of Arts in Music Core Courses
MUS Courses Titles Credits
MUS 150 Music Theory I 3
MUS 151 Aural Skills I 1
MUS 210 Music Theory II 3
MUS 211 Aural Skills II 1
MUS 250 Music Theory III 3
MUS 251 Aural Skills III 1
MUS 310 Music Theory IV 3
MUS 311 Aural Skills IV 1
MUS 305 Music History I
OR
MUS 355 Music History II 3
MUS x01 Music Performance Symposium 0
(6 semesters, grading is S/U)
MUS xxx* Primary Ensemble 6
(6 semesters, 2 upper division)
MUS xxx** Secondary Ensemble 2
(2 semesters, 1 upper division)
(Note: Music Ed emphasis exempt from this credit requirement)
MUS xxx Major Applied Lesson 12
(6 semesters, 2 upper division)
MUS 127 Functional Piano I: Beginning 1
(may be repeated)
MUS 227 Functional Piano II: Int./Proficiency 1
(may be repeated)
MUS 103 Music & Computer Technology I 1
MUS 303 Music & Computer Technology II 1
MUS 357 Orchestration and Arranging 3
MUS 358 Basic Conducting 2
____________________
TOTAL 48 (Music Ed 46)
Note: Piano student complete either of the following in lieu of Functional Piano courses:
 
MUS 346 Piano Literature
 OR
MUS 347 Piano Pedagogy 2
      _________
      TOTAL 2
   
Free Electives 35-37
       
Degree Total   120

 *Primary ensembles: (All courses MUS)

Fr Soph Jr Sr
Concert Choir 102 202 302 402
Wind Ensemble 112 212 312 412
Guitar Ensemble, Classical 132 232 332 432
Guitar Ensemble, Jazz 136 236 336 436
Piano Ensemble 142 242 342 442
Orchestra 144 244 344 444
**Secondary Ensembles: (All courses MUS)
Fr Soph Jr Sr
Brass Ensemble 114 214 314 414
Chamber Ensemble 121 221 321 421
Percussion Ensemble 124 224 324 424
Woodwind Ensemble 134 234 334 434

NOTE: Ensembles are determined by the student’s declared performance area. See advisor if further information is required.

Specific Requirements Bachelor of Arts in Music: Music Performance Emphasis

Music Core   48
 
General Education 35

NOTE: must also complete two semesters of a Foreign Language.

Music Performance Emphasis Requirements

MUS Courses Titles Credits
MUS 305 Music History I
OR
MUS 355 Music History II (other than core) 3
MUS 350 Composition and Analysis 3
MUS x01 Music Performance Symposium 0
(2 semesters, grading is S/U)
MUS 380-399 Junior Recital 2
MUS 470-489 Senior Recital 2
MUS xxx Primary Ensemble 2
(2 semester, upper division)
MUS 359 Advanced Conducting 2
__________
TOTAL 14

Note: Vocal students must also complete the following:

MUS 323 Diction for Singers 3
_________
TOTAL 3

Note: Piano students must also complete the following:

MUS 346 Piano Pedagogy 2
(substitute for 2 credits of Functional Piano, MUS 127 and 227)
MUS 347 Piano Literature 2
_________
TOTAL 4
Music Electives 20-23
Degree Total 120

Specific Requirements Bachelor of Arts in Music: Music Education Emphasis

Music Core   (Music Ed) 46
General Education 35

NOTE: Social Science requirements must include PSYCH 151 (Human Development)

Music Education Emphasis Requirements

MUS Courses Titles Credits
MUS 305 Music History I
OR
MUS 355 Music History II (other than core) 3
MUS x01 Music Performance Symposium 0
(1 semester, grading is S/U)  
MUS 470-489 Senior Recital 2
MUS 359 Advanced Conducting 2
MUS 113 Vocal Techniques and Diction 1
MUS 223 Percussion Techniques 1
MUS 233 Woodwind Techniques 1
MUS 243 String Techniques 1
MUS 253 Brass Techniques 1
MUS 340 Elementary Music Methods 3
MUS 440 Secondary Music Methods 3
__________
TOTAL 18
Education Requirements
Courses Titles Credits
ED 202 Foundations of Education 3
ED 301 Frameworks of Teaching 3
RDG 435 Content Area Literacy 4
ED 412 Teaching Diverse Learners 3
ED 485 Capstone Seminar 2
ED 489 Student Teaching K-12 12
__________
TOTAL 27
Degree Total 126

There are also licensure requirements in educational technology and educational psychology; consult the Teacher Education Program for details.

Specific Requirements for the Music Minor

MUS Courses Titles Credits
MUS 118 Music Appreciation 3
MUS 127 Functional Piano I: Beginning 1
MUS xxx Ensemble (4 semesters) 4
MUS x01 Music Performance Symposium (4 semesters) 0
MUS 150 Music Theory I 3
MUS 151 Aural Skills I 1
MUS 210 Music Theory II 3
MUS 211 Aural Skills II 1
MUS xxx Applied, non major (4 semesters) 4
      __________
TOTAL 20

Additional Information

The Department of Music Student Handbook is intended as a supplement to the University Catalog and is binding in all matters relating to the Department of Music at Colorado State University-Pueblo. A copy of the handbook may be found on the University Department of Music website, and printed copies are located in the Music office (A/M 175) and in all music faculty offices. The Colorado State University-Pueblo Department of Music is an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Music.

NON-PROFIT ADMINISTRATION MINOR

The Minor in Non-Profit Administration is a multi-disciplinary program designed for students who wish to pursue careers in non-profit organizations in the arts, health care, social services, professional societies, non-governmental organizations, and so forth. A broad variety of electives in both the College of Humanities and Social Sciences and the Hasan School of Business allows students to gain skills that will help them in the various activities often demanded of non-profit administrators.

Specific Requirements for the Non-Profit Administration Minor

Core Courses: 9 credits
 
Courses Titles Credits
MCCNM 370 Nonprofit Organizations and Communication 3
POLSC 330 Introduction to Public Administration
  OR
ACCTG 201 Principles of Financial Accounting 3
PSYCH 315 Industrial/Organizational Psych
OR
MGMT 201 Principles of Management
OR
MCCNM 240 Public Relations 3
       
Elective Courses: 12 credits

The following courses are suggested electives. Students are encouraged to identify courses that will assist in their specific nonprofit career goals. Students are required to earn 12 credits, but can choose additional electives. The required 12 credits can fall within the same content area or across disciplines. Some courses may require prerequisites.

Courses

Titles Credits
ART 281 Graphic Design 3
BUSAD 270 Business Communication 3
ECON 202 Microeconomics 3
ECON 330 Public Finance 3
ENG 303 Adv. Comp., Rhet. & Grammar 3
ENG 305 Technical & Scientific Report Writing 3
ENG 326 Writing for the Web 3
ENG 440 Magazine Writing 3
FIN 330 Principles of Finance 3
MCCNM 211 Desktop Publishing 3
MCCNM 216 Advertising 3
MCCNM 240 Public Relations 3
MCCNM 321 Public Relations Case Problems 3
MCCNM 422 Public Relations Writing 3
MCCNM 430 Integrated Comm. Campaigns 3
MGMT 301 Organizational Behavior 3
MGMT 318 Human Resource Management 3
MKTG 340 Principles of Marketing 3
POLSC 340 Public Policy 3
POLSC 411 Legislatures and Legislation 3
POLSC 480 Practicum in Politics and Public Service 3
SPN 130 Cultures of the Spanish-Spkg World 3
SW 350 Social Welfare Policy 3
SW 324 Social Work Intervention III 3
Internship: 3 credits

Students are required to earn a 3-credit internship in a nonprofit organization to be approved by the nonprofit advisor.

PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT

Department Chair: L. Madrid
Faculty: Binggeli, Frankmann, Kulkosky, Levy, Madrid, Pratarelli, Yescavage

Psychology is a field of inquiry which is called the science of behavior and answers questions about how and why organisms behave as they do. The field of psychology is enormous with many sub fields. Some areas pertain to animals, while others are focused on the behavior of humans. Still other areas focus on, abnormal behavior or complex social and emotional behavior while the cognitive area focuses on how people perceive, learn, remember, and think.

Psychology is a discipline based on theoretical perspectives and information gained through research. Therefore, the psychology major is based on understanding theory as well as learning the methods of inquiry, evaluation, and drawing appropriate conclusions. These skills are useful for problem solving in many applied settings.

The bachelor’s degree program in psychology at CSU-Pueblo offers a curriculum which provides the student with an overview of the major areas within psychology, along with the opportunity to select courses which fit their personal interests. Through psychology courses at CSU-Pueblo, a student can enhance their career opportunities and/or gain an academic grounding for professional and graduate training. Students who seek careers as professional psychologists should consider studies at the graduate level. Students are encouraged to take advantage of many opportunities in the psychology department including field placements and both laboratory and field-based research. There is a local chapter of Psi Chi, the National Honor Society in Psychology, which encourages students to maintain excellence in scholarship. Students are encouraged to participate in both Psi Chi and the Psychology Club.

Expected Student Outcomes

  • Psychology graduates should have factual knowledge about significant theories, issues, and methods of inquiry. They should be able to compare the major theoretical perspectives represented in psychology.
     
  • Psychology graduates should have acquired the skills needed to comprehend basic psychological concepts such as critical thinking, statistical thinking, and identifying valid and invalid conclusions based on empirical evidence.
     
  • Graduates should be able to read and write complex prose, to comprehend journal articles, and to present a coherent and persuasive argument on a psychological topic.
     
  • Graduates should have skills of information gathering and synthesis including appropriate use of library and internet materials and the ability to derive conclusions after surveying a variety of sources.
     
  • Psychology graduates should be able to demonstrate an understanding of theoretical biases, especially as they relate to minority groups and sexist thinking.
     
  • Students should gain practical experience in the form of relevant volunteer activities, field experience, work experience, or research assistantships.

Bachelor of Science Degree in Psychology

Students must complete all of the major degree requirements. In addition, students must complete 8 credits in the natural sciences or math beyond their general education courses. EXHP 162 and EXHP 162L cannot be used to satisfy the additional science requirement. Bachelor of Arts Degree in Psychology

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Psychology

Students must complete all of the major degree requirements. In addition, students must complete the language requirement as stated in the University catalog. This requirement includes completion of the second semester of a foreign language with a grade of C or better and includes American Sign Language. FL 100 and ANTHR/ENG 106 are appropriate substitutes.

Major Requirements

A total of 42 hours in psychology is required for the major. Psychology majors should consult a faculty advisor who will assist in selecting psychology courses to complete the major.

Basic Core Requirements

PSYCH  Courses Titles Credits
PSYCH 100 General Psychology 3
PSYCH 103 Introductory Psychology for Majors 2
PSYCH 207/L Quantitative Research Methods I/Lab 4
PSYCH 209/L Quantitative Research Methods II/Lab 4
PSYCH 401 History & Systems of Psychology 3
Two of the following courses 6
PSYCH 311 Theories of Personality
PSYCH 352 Social Psychology
PSYCH 353 Advanced Developmental Psych
PSYCH 362 Abnormal Psychology
One of the following courses 3
PSYCH 336 Learning and Motivation
PSYCH 337 Memory and Cognition
One of the following courses with lab 4
PSYCH 331/L Physiological Psychology/Lab
PSYCH 334/L Perception/Lab
One of the following courses 3
PSYCH 314 Environmental Psychology
PSYCH 315 Industrial/Organizational Psych
PSYCH 342 Educational Psychology
PSYCH 471 Clinical Psychology
__________
TOTAL 42

PSYCH ELECTIVES:

PSYCH Courses Titles Credits
PSYCH 110 Improving Memory 2
PSYCH 151 Intro to Human Development 3
PSYCH  205 Intro to Sport Psychology 3
PSYCH 211 Women and Society 3
PSYCH 212 Sexism and Racism in America 3
PSYCH 220 Drugs and Behavior 3
PSYCH 222 Understanding Animal Behavior 3
PSYCH 231 Marriage and Family Relationships 3
PSYCH 241 Human Sexuality 2
PSYCH 251 Infancy, Childhood and Preadolescence 3
PSYCH 351 Psych of Exceptional Individual 3
PSYCH 381 Principles of Psychological Testing I 4
PSYCH 410 Advanced Data Analysis 3
PSYCH 420 Human Evolutionary Psych 3
PSYCH 463 Psychopathology of Childhood 3
PSYCH 464/L Systems of Counseling and Psychotherapy/Lab 4
PSYCH 465 Behavior Modification 3
PSYCH 475 Group Process 3
PSYCH 494 Field Experience 4-12
PSYCH 495 Independent Study 1-3

All students are required to declare a minor or earn 18 credits in the Humanities and/or the Social Sciences beyond their major requirements and the general education requirements.

Prerequisites

Students should be aware that there are prerequisites to some courses. For instance, it is important to note that 2 years of high-school algebra (or equivalent) is the prerequisite for Psychology 207 & 209. Successful completion of Psychology 207 is the prerequisite for Psychology 209. Psychology 401 should not be taken until the senior year, preferably in the last semester before graduation.

Note:

A maximum of 6 credit hours of field experience and/or individual projects may be applied towards the required 42 total hours in psychology.

General Education

General Education requirements are to be taken outside of the major. Therefore, students who major in psychology may not use psychology courses for general education.

Upper Division Requirement

Psychology majors must take a minimum of 24 credits of upper-division coursework in psychology.

GPA

A minimum grade of C is required in all psychology courses counting toward the psychology major.

Requirements for the Psychology Minor

  • Twenty credits of psychology, which must include PSYCH 100 and nine credits of upper-division coursework. Credits in PSYCH 494 and 495 do not count toward the minor. A maximum of three credits of PSYCH 495 may count towards the minor if the project undertaken is research based.
     
  • A minimum grade of C in all psychology courses counting toward the minor.

Psychology Concentration under the Liberal Studies Major

In addition to Psychology 151 and 342, which are required of all Teacher Education majors, the following courses will fulfill the requirements for the concentration in Psychology under the Liberal Studies Major.

Course Title Credits
PSYCH 251 Child Psychology 3
 
This course is required of all Liberal Studies majors who choose Psychology as a concentration area.
Select nine credit hours from the following list 9
Courses Titles Credits
PSYCH 220 Drugs and Behavior 3
PSYCH 231 Marriage and Family Relationships 3
PSYCH 311 Theories of Personality 3
PSYCH 336 Learning 3
PSYCH 337 Memory & Cognition 3
PSYCH 352 Social Psychology 3
PSYCH 353 Advanced Developmental Psychology 3
PSYCH 362 Abnormal Psychology 3
PSYCH 463 Psychopathology of Childhood 3
PSYCH 465 Behavior Modification 3

Career/Employment for Psychology Majors

Psychology is a diverse field with hundreds of career paths. Some specialties, like caring for mentally ill people, are familiar to most of us. Others, like studying how we know and remember things, are less well known.

Across the nation, psychology is the second most popular undergraduate major, even though many of those who choose psychology as a major may not be interested in psychology as a career. About 10 percent of psychology majors pursue graduate training and at CSU-Pueblo there is excellent preparation available for students wishing to apply to graduate programs in psychology.

For those students who do not wish to become professional psychologists, many jobs are available. Psychology is a valuable major for a Liberal Arts degree. Jobs are found in various sectors of society and psychology graduates are most often employed as interviewers, counselors, mental health workers, human service practitioners, personnel analysts, probation officers, and writers. Employers find that psychology graduates possess strong people skills and psychology majors also value these skills themselves

Psychology majors cite courses in the principles of human behavior as especially important to life after college. Additional insight gained from these courses into what motivates people to perform at their peak helps them, whether they are functioning as parents at home, coaching athletics, or managers on the job.

Training in the scientific method - the need to do thorough, objective research, analyze data logically, and put forth the findings with clarity - stands psychology majors in good stead as they pursue future careers.

SOCIAL WORK DEPARTMENT

Department Chair: Noel
Faculty: Baca, Gonzales, Kidd, Reilly-Sandoval

The profession of social work is dedicated to helping individuals, families, groups, neighborhoods and communities meet basic human needs within the context of culture and society. Fundamental to social work practice is the enhancement of social functioning from a person-in-environment perspective. Particular attention is given to populations at risk, the services that have been developed to meet their needs, and societal change to achieve a more humane and just society.

The Department of Social Work has been continuously accredited by the Council on Social work Education (CSWE) since 1982. Students who earn a BSW degree from Colorado State University-Pueblo may be eligible for advanced standing in a social work graduate program. However, requirements for advanced standing varies with each graduate social work program.

Social Work Program Mission

The Social Work Program’s mission is to prepare students for beginning generalist social work practice across client systems. The program is committed to promoting social and economic justice through excellence, creativity, and innovation. The curriculum incorporates a strong knowledge, value, and skill base. As a Hispanic Serving Institution, there is an emphasis on understanding, appreciating, and developing competent practice with the Chicano/Chicana community and other regional populations of the southwestern United States.

Social Work Program Goals

The goals of the Social Work Program are to:

  • Prepare students for beginning generalist practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities;
     
  • Prepare students for lifelong learning, communication, and critical thinking skills through an educational process which integrates a liberal arts foundation with professional social work education;
     
  • Prepare students to understand the forms and dynamics of power, oppression, and discrimination and to develop skills to effectively advocate for social and economic justice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities;
     
  • Prepare students for professional practice based on the values and ethics of the social work profession;
     
  • Prepare students for generalist practice with rural, immigrant, and migrant client populations;
     
  • Prepare students for generalist practice with populations-at-risk; and
     
  • Prepare students with knowledge, values, and skills necessary to successfully complete graduate education.

Program Objectives

Upon successful completion of the program, students will be able to:

  • Apply critical thinking skills based on theoretical knowledge;
     
  • Apply the values and ethics of the social work profession with various client systems;
     
  • Apply generalist practice skills from a person-in-environment strengths perspective in work with diverse populations of various sizes with emphasis on Chicanos/Chicanas, First Nations and indigenous people, and rural, immigrant, and migrant populations representative of the southwestern United States;
     
  • Understand and integrate the history of the social work profession and the social welfare system into practice;
     
  • Apply theoretical knowledge of the biological, psychological, social, cultural, and spiritual factors that impact the development, behavior, beliefs and values of client systems of various sizes across the life span;
     
  • Understand and analyze the impact of social policies on diverse client systems of various sizes;
     
  • Differentially and effectively use communication skills with a variety of client populations, colleagues, and members of the community;
     
  • Understand the forms of oppression and discrimination;
     
  • Apply strategies to eliminate or alleviate discrimination and oppression;
     
  • Apply knowledge and strategies to effect change in the larger society;
     
  • Evaluate research and incorporate results into practice;
     
  • Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of cultural diversity;
     
  • Apply strategies which enhance the well-being and social functioning of individuals, families, groups, communities, organizations, and the larger society;
     
  • Apply knowledge and skills in utilizing community and agency resources to meet basic needs of client systems and/or develop needed resources;
     
  • Apply generalist practice skills from a strengths perspective in work with populations-at-risk; and
     
  • Demonstrate an appropriate use of professional knowledge, values, and skills to effect change with individuals, families, groups, communities, organizations, and the larger society.

Coursework leading to the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) degree involves the development of knowledge, values, and skills inherent in the social work profession from a person-in-environment strengths perspective. Courses required for the major incorporate a broad liberal arts base to promote critical thinking and an appreciation and understanding of diversity.

Requirements for the Social Work Major

General Education Foundation Courses

General Education 35 credit hours

As a base for professional intervention, social work practice requires mastery of knowledge and skills commonly taught in the liberal arts. Students planning to major in social work should select general education courses that develop proficiency in verbal and written communication, competency in problem solving, and promote critical and analytical thinking. Courses that incorporate human growth and behavior, diversity, and the interaction of individuals, groups, neighborhoods, communities and society, within the context of social, economic, political, and governmental systems, provide a substantive base for majors. Students must complete the University’s general education requirements prior to enrollment in upper division social work courses.

Professional Foundation Courses 36 credit hours
Specified social science courses 21
Basic social work courses 15

Social Work Foundation Courses

A grade of C or above must be earned in all courses required by the major. The following specific courses are required as foundation for enrollment in upper division social work classes.

Courses   Titles Credits
BIOL 100 Principles of Biology 3
CS 101 Intro to Chicano Studies 3
PSYCH 100 General Psychology 3
SOC 101 Intro to Sociology 3
A course covering women’s studies 3
A course in basic statistics or SW 210 3
 A course in economics or political science 3
__________
TOTAL 21

Courses in the social work curriculum are provided in the areas of human behavior and the social environment, social welfare policy and services, social research, social work practice and field practicum. Learning takes place in the classroom and in approved agency settings under supervision. Early in the curriculum students learn about social agencies and the roles of social service providers through a volunteer placement for 45 clock hours in an approved agency required for a social work class, Introduction to Social Work Practice (SW 222). Courses in the major must be taken in sequence because knowledge in higher level courses is built on the mastery of information in previous courses.

SW Courses Titles Credits
SW 100 Intro to Social Work 3
SW 201 Human Behavior & Social Environment I 3
SW 202 Human Behavior & Social Environment II 3
SW 205 Social Welfare in the US 3
SW 222 Intro to Social Work Practice 3
__________
TOTAL 15

Admission into the Social Work Program

The social work major is a professional program and as such requires two additional admission processes following admission into the University: the first is admission into the social work program and the second is admission into the field practicum. Social work majors must be accepted into the program prior to enrolling in 300 and 400 level social work courses.

Application forms for admission into the program may be obtained from the department secretaries. Completed application forms are to be submitted to the department secretaries no later than October 31st for the upcoming spring semester and no later than March 15th for the upcoming fall semester. Exceptions must be approved by the Social Work Department Chair and the request must be in writing. Forms will then be distributed by the Social Work Department Chair to faculty for review and a decision will be made regarding admission into the program. The Department Chair will notify each student in writing of his/her status (admission into the program, conditional admission into the program or denial of admission into the program).

Reasons for conditional admission into the program will be identified in the letter, as well as corrective actions that need to be taken. When the requirements for admission into the program have been satisfied, the student’s status will be revised from conditional acceptance to admission into the program. If for some reason a student is not admitted to the program, the reasons for this decision will be identified in the letter to the student, along with necessary corrective actions. Reapplication may be made once corrective action has been taken.

Social Work Professional Practice Courses

Students must earn a grade of C or above in all social work professional practice courses. The following upper division social work courses are mandatory for completion of the BSW degree and require approval for acceptance into the major prior to enrollment.

SW Courses Titles Credits
SW 310 Social Work Theory 3
SW 320 Human Diversity in Practice 3
SW 322 Social Work Intervention I 3
SW 323 Social Work Intervention II 3
SW 324 Social Work Intervention III 3
SW 350 Social Welfare Policy 3
SW 481 Field Seminar I 3
SW 482 Field Seminar II 3
SW 488 Field Placement I 5
SW 489 Field Placement II 5
SW 492 Research 3
__________
TOTAL 37

Admission into the Social Work Field Practicum

The Field Practicum

Social work majors also are required to apply for admission into the field practicum. An orientation meeting is scheduled by the Field Coordinator each November for all students planning to enroll in the field practicum during the following summer session or fall semester. Application forms for admission into the practicum are distributed at this meeting and information on the admission process and placement is provided. Students unable to attend are required to meet with the Field Coordinator to obtain the forms and receive pertinent information to proceed with the practicum placement process. Applications for field placement are accepted only once a year with exceptions approved by the Field Coordinator.

Completed applications must be returned to the Field Coordinator for review and approval no later than the third week of January. Upon receipt, the application will be reviewed and the student will be notified of acceptance into the field practicum by the Field Coordinator. Late submission of the application may delay both placement into the practicum and graduation since most field practicum agencies require background checks and/or drug and alcohol testing. Students need to be aware that a criminal history may affect eligibility for placement based on agency policy, not University policy or the Department of Social Work polices.

The practicum is offered through concurrent and block placements and requires simultaneous enrollment in the field seminar. Field Seminar (SW 481) and Field Placement I (SW 488) are offered only during the fall semester. Field Seminar II (SW 482) and Field Placement II (SW 489) are offered only during the spring semester. To be eligible for the concurrent practicum, students must have completed all 100 and 200 level courses.

All courses required for the major and degree must be completed to be eligible to enroll in the block placement, which is offered only during the summer session. Block placements begin on the Monday after graduation and continue until the week before classes resume for the fall semester. Students are enrolled in Field Placement I (SW 488) and Field Seminar I (SW 481) during the first half of the summer semester and Field Seminar II (SW 482) and Field Placement II (SW 489) during the second half of the summer term.

The Field Coordinator is required to make a reasonable effort to assist a student in securing a placement. The social work student, however, not the University, is ultimately responsible for being eligible and retaining a placement under the direction of the Field Coordinator. Students unable to obtain acceptance into an approved placement after three attempts, or successfully complete a practicum, will not be awarded the BSW degree and are advised to change to a major in which they can meet degree requirements.

Students are required to complete a minimum of 448 clock hours of professionally supervised field work in an approved community social service agency. No academic credit is awarded for life experiences in this program.

RETENTION IN THE SOCIAL WORK MAJOR

In accordance with professional standards, students may be denied acceptance or withdrawn from the major or field placement for either academic or behavioral reasons.

Academic Requirements

Students must attain specific academic standards for admission into the major, continuation in the program, and field practicum for graduation. By University policy, students are required to maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 for graduation. In the social work major, a minimum GPA of 2.5 is required (professional foundation and professional practice courses). All courses designated with a SW prefix and the non-social work foundation courses must be completed with grades no lower than a 2.0.

Behavioral Requirements

Behaviors which may result in non-acceptance into the major, field practicum, or withdrawal from the social work major may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. Serious or repeated violation of the NASW Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice;
     
  2. Violation of CSU-Pueblo’s academic dishonesty policy or Student Code of Conduct;
     
  3. Unprofessional social work conduct;
     
  4. Demonstrated unwillingness or inability to use supervision;
     
  5. Personal problems that seriously and consistently interfere with the conscious and professional use of self in a helping relationship;
     
  6. Inability to accept appropriate evaluation from superiors or to modify one’s professional behaviors as requested;
     
  7. Inappropriate or disruptive behavior toward colleagues, faculty, staff or peers; and/or
     
  8. Consistent failure to demonstrate interpersonal skills necessary to form effective professional relationships.

Inappropriate behaviors will be discussed with the student and corrective actions identified. Also, students have the opportunity to appeal decisions through the due process procedures available through the University.

Electives

A minimum of 120 semester credit hours are required for the BSW degree. At least 40 hours must be taken in upper division (300-400 level) courses. Students may use social work elective courses or courses from other departments to achieve the total credit hours required. The following elective courses are offered in social work:

SW 230 Chicano: Social & Psychological Study 3
SW 290 Special Projects 1-5
SW 325 Health in the Chicano Community 3
SW 326 Social Work Practice with Older Adults 3
SW 327 Practice with Abused and Neglected Children 3
SW 370 Non-Profit Organizations & Communication 3
SW 490 Special Projects 1-5
SW 491 Special Topics 3
SW 495 Independent Study 3

SOCIOLOGY/ANTHROPOLOGY/ SOCIAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT
(Including Criminology)

Department Chair: W. Wright

Faculty: Calhoun-Stuber, Forsyth, Gomme, Green, McGettigan, Wolf

The programs in sociology, anthropology and social science are intended to increase the student’s knowledge of social organization and social relationships, knowledge that can be applied to many career objectives in government and business.

SOCIOLOGY

Sociology is the study of human social behavior and is concerned with conditions such as crime and delinquency, family problems, social inequality, and organizations in contemporary industrial society. Sociologists are interested not only in understanding social issues and institutions, but also in resolving social problems.

As an applied program, the major prepares students to work in a wide variety of occupations, including education, government, business, industry and private human service agencies. They are employed in such areas as health care, youth services, drug rehabilitation, law enforcement, corrections, probation, and counseling. Students may receive a general sociology degree, or they may specialize within the criminology emphasis area and receive a sociology/criminology degree.

The major in sociology leads to the Bachelor of Arts (BA) and the Bachelor of Science (BS). The BS is designed for those pursuing an applied, career-oriented program, while the BA requires a foreign language. Both degrees prepare students for graduate studies and applied careers.

Sociology Program Goals

  • Graduates will be able to compare and contrast the major theoretical perspectives that inform modern sociological analysis.
     
  • Graduates will be able to apply a range of research methods in conjunction with sociological theory in order to explain and analyze complex social relations and organizations.
     
  • Graduates will be able to apply social analysis to the substantive social area of their emphasis: criminology or general sociology, and will be able to present findings in a clear, understandable and concise manner.
     
  • Graduates will be able to engage in critical thinking about the relationship between social and personal experiences.
     
  • Minors will have an understanding of the significant theories, issues and methodologies of the discipline.
     
  • Minors will have an understanding of the impact of social processes and institution on personal experiences.

Expected Student Outcomes

General Requirements

  • Successful completion of the sociology core;
     
  • Successful completion of the general or the criminology emphasis areas;
     
  • No grade below a C in sociology courses is acceptable for the major or the minor; and
     
  • Completion of at least 36 credit hours in approved sociology courses.

Specific Requirements for the Sociology Major

CORE
SOC Courses Titles Credits
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3
SOC 301 Sociological Methods 3
SOC 310 Social & Cultural Theory 3
_________
TOTAL 9

General Emphasis

Students will complete the above core (9 hours) and then will select at least 27 additional credit hours of sociology courses, which may include six hours from anthropology. Courses must be approved by the advisor. At least 12 hours must be upper-division courses (300- 400 level).

Criminology Emphasis

Students will complete the three (above) core sociology courses plus four (below) criminology core courses. Further, they will complete 15 hours (five courses) of criminology electives.

Criminology electives are indicated by * in the list of all sociology courses below:

Criminology Core Courses: (12 hours)

SOC Courses Titles Credits
SOC 203 Criminal Justice System 3
SOC 303 Crime and Deviance 3
SOC 306 Delinquency & Juvenile Justice 3
SOC 420 Explaining Crime 3
Sociology Courses (*indicates criminology elective)
SOC Courses Titles
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology
SOC 105 Understanding Human Diversity
SOC 155 Minority and Ethnic Relations*
SOC 201 Social Problems*
SOC 203 Criminal Justice System
SOC 206 Gender & Society
SOC 231 Marriage & Family Relations
SOC 250 The Sacred in Culture
SOC 302 Collective Behavior and Social Movements
SOC 303 Crime and Deviance
SOC 305 Crime and Women*
SOC 306 Delinquency & Juvenile Justice
SOC 308 Popular Culture*
SOC 320 Modern Social Perspectives*
SOC 352 Social Psychology
SOC 353 Penology*
SOC 354 Urban Sociology*
SOC 355 Political Sociology*
SOC 356 Social Stratification*
SOC 358 Film & Society*
SOC 359 Community Corrections*
SOC 401 Health, Culture, & Society
SOC 402 Aging, Culture, & Society
SOC 403 Human Sexuality and Social Behavior
SOC 404 Poverty*
SOC 405 Law and Society*
SOC 406 Sociology of Small Groups
SOC 407 Family Violence*
SOC 408 Science, Technology, & the Future
SOC 409 Victimology*
SOC 410 Structural & Elite Crime*
SOC 411 Police and Society*
SOC 412 Occupations & Professions
SOC 413 Patterns of Homicide*
SOC 414 Serial Murder *
SOC 415 Forensic Criminology*
SOC 416 Crime & the Mind*
SOC 417 Forensics & Homicide Investigations*
SOC 418 Crime, Drugs and Social Policy*
SOC 419 Vice Crime*
SOC 420 Explaining Crime*
SOC 421 Homicide, Courts & Corrections*
SOC 422 Terrorism and Mass Murder*
SOC 428 Women and Work
SOC 430 Industrial Organization*
SOC 431 Work in Modern America*
SOC 432 Organization Theory*
SOC 440 Correctional Administration*
SOC 448 Emotions in American Culture
SOC 451 Culture , Deviance, & Psychopathology*
SOC 452 Self and Society
SOC 453 Sociology of the Body
SOC 455 Hate Crimes*
SOC 491 Special Topics* (see advisor)
SOC 492 Research Methods*
SOC 494 Field Experience* (see advisor)
SOC 495 Independent Study

Specific Requirements for the Sociology Minor

Minors in sociology require a minimum of 20 semester hours, of which six hours must be upper division. SOC 101 is required. No grades below C are accepted toward the minor.

Co-Curricular Requirements

Generally there are no co-curricular requirements, although students with an emphasis in criminology are encouraged to complete an internship in a community corrections type agency or program.

Outcome Assessment Activities

  • Completion of all required courses.
     
  • The department believes that grades are one valid indicator of the quality of student work. No grade below C will, therefore, be accepted toward the major or minor.
     
  • Student achievement will be assessed in the outcome areas on the basis of a standardized national achievement test.
     
  • For the sociology minor, grades will provide a valid measure of student performance. The department will examine and maintain records of grades of students minoring in sociology as one means of assessment.

ANTHROPOLOGY

The anthropology minor provides students with an informed understanding of the cultural diversity evident in human societies and the concepts by which anthropologists explain cultural dynamics. The program emphasizes a holistic awareness of the relationships of all the parts of social and cultural systems. The program prepares students to understand anthropological methods and theories and to apply them to academic as well as to life experiences.

Anthropology Program Goals

  • Students will be able to deal with intellectual problems and engage in critical thinking in a lucid fashion, reflecting logical inquiry and knowledge of pertinent information.
     
  • Students will possess knowledge and experience of cultural and sub-cultural groups other than their own.
     
  • Students will achieve an understanding of a spectrum of anthropological sub-divisions and will be knowledgeable in at least two areas.

Specific Requirements for the Anthropology Minor

The minor consists of 21 semester hours of anthropology courses; ANTHR 100 is required, and six hours must be upper division. The rest of the courses may be based upon the student’s interest. No grades below C are accepted toward the minor.

Outcome Assessment Activities

  • The assessment of anthropology students’ progress is a continuing process from matriculation to graduation.

SOCIAL SCIENCE PROGRAM
(Offered through Continuing Education only) 

The interdisciplinary major in social science (offered only through Continuing Education) leads to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts (BA) and Bachelor of Science (BS).

Social scientists study people and social institutions, especially the relationships and impacts they have with and on each other. Research in the social sciences provides insights that help in understanding the ways in which individuals and groups make decisions, exercise power or respond to change. Social scientists gather and analyze data, interpret it and make it meaningful and useful for application in dealing with human problems.

Employment has traditionally been in the academic area; however, as the economy continually changes from an industrial to a service-oriented system, a greater need for “people-oriented” specialists is developing. Job opportunities in applied fields include areas such as program management and administration, residential counseling, service supervision, human services and sales and related work -- in both the public and private sectors. Related careers are: teaching, social work, corrections/criminology, social and educational administration, law and mass communications.

Program Goals

  • Prepare students to function as knowledgeable and responsible individual citizens in society;
     
  • Prepare students for leadership roles within the broader society;
     
  • Instill in students a broad understanding of the major disciplinary approaches to the study of social life, including economics, history, sociology, geography, and political science;
     
  • Prepare students for participation in modern social institutions, as well as for the coming changes and conflicts within those institutions;
     
  • Instill in students an awareness of and appreciation for the cultural and ethnic diversity of modern society.

Expected Student Outcomes

General Requirements

  • No grade below C is acceptable in the major or minor.

Specific Requirements for the Social Science Major

General Track Credits

Social Science Core

Courses Titles Credits
ANTHR 100 Cultural Anthropology 3
ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
GEOG 103 World Regional Geography 3
HIST 103 World Civilization since 1800 3
HIST 202 US History II 3
POLSC 101 American National Politics 3
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3
______________
SUB-TOTAL 21
Social Science Electives (Upper Division) 15
__________
TOTAL 36

Specific Requirements for the Social Science Minor

  • Completion of 21 semester hours of credit in Social Science courses: Anthropology Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology. Six hours must be upper division.

SPEECH COMMUNICATION

The major and minor programs in Speech Communication have been discontinued at CSU-Pueblo.

Speech Communication courses are now housed in the Department of English and Foreign Languages. For information contact the Speech Communication Program Coordinator, Lisa Nelson, at 549-2623.

WOMEN’S STUDIES

A women’s studies minor offers you a different perspective on things you think you know. Analysis of gender issues for men and women helps you understand your major discipline in different ways. This analysis inherently incorporates issues of race, ethnicity, class, and other variables as well.

The women’s studies minor is designed to acquaint students with current scholarship on women, scholarship that crosses many disciplines. The minor is interdisciplinary and multicultural, and courses incorporate classroom and experiential learning. Students are asked to examine relevant questions and issues from a range of perspectives, enhancing their analytical and critical thinking skills in the process.

Specific Requirements for the Women’s Studies Minor

 

Courses Titles   Credits
WS 100 Introduction to Women’s Studies 3
WS/CS 306 La Chicana
OR  
WS/CS 401 Third World Feminisms 3
WS 301 Theories of Gender and Culture 3
WS 493 Senior Seminar 3
Women’s Studies Electives 9
WS Electives:
       
Courses Titles Credits
WS/SOC 206 Gender and Society 3
WS/PSYCH 211 Women and Society 3
WS/PSYCH 212 Sexism and Racism in America 3
WS/NSG 230 Women, Health, and Society 3
WS/PSYCH 231 Marriage, Family, and Relationships 3
WS/MCCNM 235 Women and Media 3
WS/CS 240 Chicana Writers 3
WS/SOC 305 Crime and Women 3
WS/CS 306 La Chicana 3
WS/MCCNM 330 Gender and Film 3
WS 335 Gender and Communication 3
WS/ENG 340 Women in Literature 3
WS/CS 401 Third World Feminisms 3
WS/SOC 403 Human Sexuality and Social Behavior 3
WS/SOC 407 Family Violence 3
WS/HIST 427 Women & Gender in European History 3
WS/HIST/SOC 428 Women & Work 3
WS/SOC 453 The Sociology of the Body 3
WS/SOC 455 Hate Crimes 3
WS 490 Special Projects 3
WS 291/491 Special Topics (topics vary) 3

Most Women’s Studies courses are cross-listed, meaning that the courses can be found in the course listings of both the Women’s Studies program and one or more other departments. This is indicated above, for example, as “WS/PSYCH 212, Sexism and Racism in America,” indicating that the course is listed as both a Women’s Studies course and a Psychology course. The courses can be taken by enrolling in either a Women’s Studies call number or in another department’s call number. To encourage breadth, students are required to choose electives in different cross-listed disciplines, with no more than two of their electives being cross-listed in the same department (for example, Psychology). Grades below a C- will not be accepted in classes counting toward the minor. For advising, students should contact any Women’s Studies instructor, or the Women’s Studies Coordinator, or any member of the Women’s Studies Coordinating Committee, by calling 549-2143.