College of Education, Engineering, & Professional Studies

Dr. Hector Carrasco, Dean

Academic Departments

Automotive Industry Management and Facilities Management and Technology Studies

Major: Automotive Industry Management (BS)
   
Minor:  Automotive Industry Management

Engineering
Majors:  Engineering (BSE)
Industrial Engineering (BSIE)
Industrial and Systems Engineering (MS)
(See Graduate Programs section of catalog.) 
   
Minors:  Engineering
Industrial Engineering 

Engineering Technology

Major:  Civil Engineering Technology (BSCET) 

Exercise Science, Health Promotion, and Recreation

Major:  Exercise Science, Health Promotion and Recreation (BS) 
   
  Emphasis Areas:
   
Minors:  Coaching
Exercise Science and Health Promotion
Recreation 

Nursing

Nursing  Nursing (BSN)
Nursing (MS) (See Graduate Programs section of catalog. 

Teacher Education 

Licensure Areas:   Elementary
Secondary
K-12
 
   
Minors:  Education
Reading 

Mission

The College of Education, Engineering, and Professional Studies degree programs reflect Colorado State University-Pueblo’s professional focus and are designed to prepare graduates for positions in industry, education, business, and governmental agencies.

The mission of the College is to offer a career-oriented education that efficiently and effectively prepares students to excel as professionals.

Mission objectives:

  • To be the premier educational institution in Southern Colorado that provides professional programs.
  • To be the preferred source in Southern Colorado for consulting services, research effort, service learning, and other linkages to the public schools, industry, and the community.
  • To be recognized for effectiveness in the professional development of faculty, staff, and students.
The College embraces the model of continuous improvement through the use of assessment in evaluating and improving student learning.

DEPARTMENT OF AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY MANAGEMENT AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY STUDIES

Department Chair: Ronald Darby

AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

Faculty: Darby, Robbe, Sefcovic

The major in automotive industry management leads to a Bachelor of Science (BS) Degree and is designed to prepare its students for automotive industry management careers by providing automotive management skills, supported by the business and technical background requisite for success in the automotive industry. The curriculum emphasizes personnel supervision, financial analysis, customer relations, warranty administration, sales promotions, techniques of technical problem-solving, service management, marketing, merchandising and distribution methods used by the automotive aftermarket, automotive manufacturer and import industries.

Program Goals

  • Prepare students with the appropriate knowledge and skills to enter the workforce as productive, accountable and responsible employees.
  • To provide students with theoretical and hands-on laboratory experiences designed to develop the knowledge and skills for success in automotive management careers.
  • To utilize an advisory committee of automotive business leaders to advise and support the AIM program on a range of issues, which includes keeping the curriculum current with industry needs.

Expected Student Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the AIM curriculum, the graduate should:

  • Possess technical knowledge and understanding of various automotive systems-engines, suspension and brakes, power trains and drive lines, fuel and emissions, electrical and electronic…
  • Possess knowledge and understanding of the operation and management of the automotive parts business—financial systems, computerized management and inventory control systems, customer relations, environmental regulations…
  • Possess knowledge and understanding of general business operations—courses taken within the Hasan School of Business that comprise a minor in Business Administration, plus additional selected courses.

General Requirements for the AIM Program

  • AIM majors are required to complete an approved curriculum with a minimum grade of C earned in all major courses.
  • AIM majors are required to demonstrate intellectual skills and knowledge in related business courses to satisfy the minor and institutional requirements.
  • AIM minors are required to complete the approved curriculum with a minimum grade of C earned in all minor courses.

Specific Requirements for the AIM Major

AIM Courses Titles Credits
AIM 105 Intro to the Parts & Serv Indus.. 1
AIM 115 Automotive Engine Design & Operation 5
AIM 125/L Automotive Susp & Brake Systems/Lab 4
AIM 155 Automotive Parts Operations 4
AIM 165/L Automotive Power Trains & Dr Lines/Lab 4
AIM 235/L Automotive Fuel Systems & Exhaust/Lab 4
AIM 245/L Automotive Electrical Systems I/Lab 4
AIM 255/L utomotive Electrical Systems II/Lab 4
AIM 265 Automotive Parts Management Systems 4
AIM 305 Automotive Customer Service Regulatory Issues 3
AIM 325 Fuels & Lube Production, Mktg & Conservation 3
AIM 335 Automotive Shop Practices 5 AIM 345 Advanced Automotive Systems 5
AIM 405 Personal Selling Methods & Techniques 4
AIM 425 Automotive Financial Mgmt 5
__________
TOTAL 59
Other Required Courses
Courses   Titles Credits 
ACCTG 201 Principles of Financial Acctg 3
ACCTG 202 Principles of Managerial Acctg 3
BUSAD 302 Ethical Issues 3
CIS Course(s) as per advisement 2
ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
ECON 202 Principles of Microeconomics 3
FIN 330 Principles of Finance 3
MGMT 201 Principles of Management 3
MGMT 311 Operations and Quality Management 3
MGMT 318 Human Resource Management 3
MKTG 340 Principles of Marketing 3
MATH 156 Intro to Statistics 3
SPCOM 103 Speaking and Listening 3
__________
TOTAL 38

AIM majors are required to complete the business courses required by the major but not included in the BUSAD minor with a grade point average of 2.0 (C).

Institutional and General Education

Please refer to the General Education Requirements in the Undergraduate Programs section of this catalog or refer to your individual program’s curriculum sheet.

Specific Requirements for the AIM Minor

AIM Courses Titles Credits
AIM 115 Automotive Engine Design & Operation 5
AIM 235/L Automotive Fuel Systems and Exhaust Emissions Systems/Lab 4
AIM 245/L Automotive Electrical Systems I/Lab 4
Approved AIM Electives (min) 7
  __________
TOTAL 20

Outcomes Assessment Activities

  • The program will keep a portfolio for each AIM major and minor containing a record of achievement, showing improvement in intellectual skills, knowledge and capacities between entrance and graduation.
     

  • Required courses are monitored to assure that quality of content and delivery is maintained to a high standard.
     
  • A National Advisory Committee meets to assess and offer advice to the program faculty and students regarding the quality of the AIM program.
     
  • Enrollment and retention are monitored as a gauge of program effectiveness.
     
  • Graduate placement within the area of study is monitored.

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY STUDIES

Program Coordinator: Ron Darby
Faculty: TBA

A Bachelor of Science in Facilities Management and Technology Studies (FMTS) is currently offered; but no new students will be admitted to the program after February 2005.

Students currently enrolled in this program have until May 2008 to complete their major courses (courses with an FMTS prefix). Questions should be directed to the Program Coordinator.

DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING

Department Chair: Jane M. Fraser

Faculty: Carrasco, DePalma, Fraser, Jaksic, Sarper, Sinkhorn

The Department of Engineering offers the following engineering programs:

  • The Bachelor of Science in Engineering with a Mechatronics specialization (BSE-Mechatronics),
  • The Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering (BSIE),
  • The Master of Science in Industrial and Systems Engineering (MS),
  • The Pre Engineering program,
  • The Minor in Engineering,
  • and The Minor in Industrial Engineering.

The BSE-Mechatronics is a 4-year program that can be completed at CSU-Pueblo. The program began in Fall 2005 and the first students will graduate from the program in Spring 2008. Mechatronics combines mechanical and electrical engineering with computers to create devices that make our lives better. Electrical and mechanical systems, controlled by computers, are at the core of a wide range of processes and products. Robots, the Mars Rover, a heart-lung machine, a computer controlled telescope, and a nano-scale microscope are all examples of mechatronics. The BS in Engineering with specialization in mechatronics is a flexible, broad degree that prepares graduates to work in many industries.

The BSIE is a 4-year program that can be completed at CSU-Pueblo. The program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202, telephone: (410) 347-7700. As defined by the Institute of Industrial Engineers, “industrial engineering is concerned with the design, improvement and installation of integrated systems of people, materials, information, equipment, and energy. It draws upon specialized knowledge and skill in the mathematical and physical sciences, together with the principles and methods of engineering analysis and design, to specify, predict and evaluate the results to be obtained from such integrated systems.” Industrial engineering is a major branch of engineering with applications in manufacturing, service, governmental, and non-profit organizations. Industrial engineers are productivity and quality specialists who deal with the human aspects of work in addition to the advanced technologies of computer software and production related hardware.

A student can receive the BSE-Mechatronics and BSIE degree simultaneously by taking 30 additional credit hours over one degree alone, including a second senior design project.

For more information on the MS degree with a major in Industrial and Systems Engineering, see the Graduate Studies section of this catalog.

In the Pre-Engineering program, students seeking to major in some area of engineering other than industrial engineering or engineering with a mechatronics specialization (for example, civil, electrical, or mechanical engineering) can complete at least 60 credits that will transfer to other engineering schools.

The Department of Engineering has found that transfer students are very successful in our programs and we welcome transfer students. About half our graduates began their degrees at other institutions.

BSE-MECHATRONICS

BSE-Mechatronics Program Outcomes

The BSE-Mechatronics program is designed so that students graduate from the program with the following abilities and knowledge:

  • An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering,
     
  • An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data,
     
  • An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs,
     
  • An ability to function on and lead multi-disciplinary teams,
     
  • An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems,
     
  • An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility,
     
  • An ability to communicate effectively,
     
  • The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context,
     
  • A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning,
     
  • A knowledge of contemporary issues, and
     
  • An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

BSE-Mechatronics Educational Objectives

During the first few years after graduation, BSE-Mechatronic graduates should be able:

  • Conduct low-level designs and modifications of mechatronic systems,
     
  • Trouble shoot and support existing mechatronic systems,
     
  • Work directly with suppliers and customers of mechatronic systems,
     
  • Manage small and support large engineering projects,
     
  • Assume ownership and accountability for engineering projects,
     
  • Function well on teams of engineers with different skill levels,
     
  • Implement basic quality control principles,
     
  • Write sound technical documents such as requests for proposals, grant applications, project specifications and technical reports,
     
  • Continue their education at the graduate level, and
     
  • Obtain additional engineering certifications.
     

Specific Requirements for the BSE-Mechatronics Degree

EN Courses Titles Credits
EN 101 Problem Solving for Engineers 3
EN 103 Introduction to Engineering 2
EN 107 Engineering Graphics 2
EN 211 Engineering Mechanics I 3
EN 212 Engineering Mechanics II 3
EN 231/L Circuit Analysis/Lab 5
EN 260 Basic Electronics 2
EN 263 Electromechanical Devices 3
EN 321 Thermodynamics I 3
EN 324/L Materials Science & Engr/Lab 4
EN 343 Engineering Economy 3
EN 360 Control Systems I 3
EN 361 Digital Electronics 4
EN 362 Introduction to Mechatronics 3
EN 363 Virtual Machine Design 3
EN 365 Stochastic Systems Engineering 4
EN 430 Project Planning and Control 3
EN 441 Engineering of Manufacturing Process 4
EN 443 Quality Control & Reliability 3
EN 460 Control Systems II 3
EN 462 Industrial Robotics 3
EN 473 Computer Integrated Manufacturing 3
EN 488 Engineering Design Project 3
EN 493 Senior Seminar 2
Technical Electives 6
__________
TOTAL 80

Other Required Courses

Courses Titles Credits
MATH 126 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I 5
MATH 224 Calculus & Analytic Geometry II 5
MATH 207 Matrix & Vector Algebra with Applications 2
MATH 337 Differential Equations I 3
PHYS 221/L General Physics I/Lab 5
PHYS 222/L General Physics II/Lab 5
ENG 101 Composition I 3
ENG 102 Composition II 3
SPCOM 103 Speaking and Listening 3
General Education 15
__________
  TOTAL 49
DEGREE TOTAL 129

Technical electives must be chosen from an approved list or have the approval of an Engineering advisor. General Education courses must include depth in some area.

Typical Schedule of Courses for the BSE-Mechatronics Degree

Freshman Year

Courses Titles Credits
EN 101 Problem Solving for Engineers 3
EN 103 Introduction to Engineering 2
EN 107 Engineering Graphics 2
ENG 101 Composition I 3
ENG 102 Composition II 3
MATH 126 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I 5
MATH 224 Calculus & Analytic Geometry II 5
PHYS 221/L General Physics I/Lab 5
General Education 3
__________
TOTAL 31

Sophomore Year

Courses Titles Credits
EN 211 Engineering Mechanics I 3
EN 212 Engineering Mechanics II 3
EN 231/L Circuit Analysis I/Lab 5
EN 260 Basic Electronics 2
EN 263 Electromechanical Devices 3
EN 324/L Material Science & Engr/Lab 4
MATH 207 Matrix & Vector Algebra with Applications 2
MATH 337 Differential Equations I 3
PHYS 222/L General Physics II/Lab 5
__________
TOTAL 30

Junior Year

Courses Titles Credits
EN 321 Thermodynamics 3
EN 343 Engineering Economy 3
EN 360 Control Systems I 3
EN 361 Digital Electronics 4
EN 362 Introduction to Mechatronics 3
EN 363 Virtual Machine Design 3
EN 365 Stochastic Systems Engineering 4
EN 441 Manufacturing Processes 4
EN 443 Quality Control & Reliability 3
SPCOM 103 Speaking and Listening 3
__________
TOTAL 33

Senior Year

Courses Titles Credits
EN 430 Project Planning & Control 3
EN 460 Control Systems II 3
EN 462 Industrial Robotics 3
EN 473 Computer Integrated Manufacturing 3
EN 488 Engineering Design Project 3
EN 493 Senior Seminar 2
Technical Electives 6
General Education 12
__________
TOTAL 35

BSIE

The BSIE program has the following educational objectives and outcomes, which have been approved and are reviewed regularly by the BSIE Advisory Board.

BSIE Program Outcomes

The BSIE program is designed so that students graduate from the program with the following abilities and knowledge:

  • An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering,
     
  • An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data,
     
  • An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs,
     
  • An ability to function on and lead multi-disciplinary teams, An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems,
     
  • An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility,
     
  • An ability to communicate effectively,
     
  • The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context,
     
  • A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning,
     
  • A knowledge of contemporary issues,
     
  • An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.
     
  • An ability to design systems (such as production, supply chain, quality control, and manufacturing systems) to achieve high efficiency, quality, and safety, and
     
  • An ability to identify and implement improvements to methods, procedures, equipment, and workflow to increase efficiency, quality, and safety.
     

BSIE Educational Objectives:

During the first few years after graduation, BSIE graduates should be able to:

  • Identify root causes of symptoms and fix problems in situations where data and resources may be lacking and multiple problems may exist,
     
  • Function well on teams of engineers with different skill levels,
     
  • Obtain jobs of increasing responsibility applying industrial engineering skills and knowledge to a wide range of problems in a wide range of industries,
     
  • Continue their education, for example, in MS, PhD, and MBA programs,
     
  • Obtain additional certifications, such as Professional Engineer, Six Sigma Black Belt, or Certified Manufacturing Engineer, and
     
  • Achieve management positions.

Specific Requirements for the BSIE Degree

EN Courses Titles Credits
EN 101 Problem Solving for Engineers 3
EN 103 Introduction to Engineering 2
EN 107 Engineering Graphics 2
EN 211 Engineering Mechanics I 3
EN 212 Engineering Mechanics II 3
EN 215 Intro to Indus & Sys Engineering 3
EN 231/L Circuit Analysis/Lab 5
EN 321 Thermodynamics 3
EN 324/L Materials Science & Engr/Lab 4
EN 343 Engineering Economy 3
EN 365 Stochastic Systems Engineering 4
EN 420 Simulation Experiments 4
EN 430 Project Planning 3
EN 439 Time and Motion Studies 2
EN 440 Safety Engineering 3
EN 441 Manufacturing Processes 4
EN 443 Quality Control and Reliability 3
EN 471 Operations Research 3
EN 473 Computer Integrated Manufacturing 3
EN 475 Facilities Planning and Design 3
EN 477 Operations Planning and Control 3
EN 488 Engineering Design Projects 3
EN 493 Senior Seminar 2
Technical Electives 6
__________
TOTAL 77

Other Required Courses

Courses Titles Credits
MATH 126 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 5
MATH 207 Matrix & Vector Algebra with Applications 2
MATH 224 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 5
MATH 337 Differential Equations I 3
PHYS 221/L General Physics I/Lab 5
PHYS 222/L General Physics II/Lab 5
ENG 101 Composition I 3

ENG 102 Composition II 3
SPCOM 103 Speaking and Listening 3
General Education 15
__________
TOTAL 49
DEGREE TOTAL 126

Technical electives must be chosen from an approved list or have the approval of an Engineering advisor. General Education courses must include depth in some area.

Typical Schedule of Courses for the BSIE Degree

Freshman Year

Course Titles Credits
EN 101 Problem Solving for Engineers 3
EN 103 Introduction to Engineering 2
EN 107 Engineering Graphics 2
ENG 101 Composition I 3
ENG 102 Composition II 3
MATH 126 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I 5
MATH 224 Calculus & Analytic Geometry II 5
PHYS 221/L General Physics I/Lab 5
General Education 3
__________
TOTAL 31

Sophomore Year

Courses Titles Credits
EN 211 Engineering Mechanics I 3
EN 212 Engineering Mechanics II 3
EN 215 Intro to Indus & Sys Engineering 3
EN 231/L Circuit Analysis/Lab 5
EN 324/L Materials Science & Engr/Lab 4
PHYS 222/L General Physics II/Lab 5
MATH 207 Matrix & Vector Algebra with Applications 2
MATH 337 Differential Equations I 3
SPCOM 103 Speaking & Listening 3
General Education 3
__________
TOTAL 34

Junior Year

Courses Titles Credits
EN 321 Thermodynamics I 3
EN 343 Engineering Economy 3
EN 365 Stochastic Systems Engineering 4
EN 420 Simulation Experiments 4
EN 439 Time and Motion Studies 2
EN 441 Manufacturing Processes 4
EN 443 Quality Control and Reliability 3
EN 471 Operations Research 3
General Education 3
Technical Elective 3
__________
TOTAL 32

Senior Year

Courses Titles Credits
EN 430 Project Planning and Control 3
EN 440 Safety Engineering 3
EN 473 Computer Integrated Manufacturing 3
EN 475 Facilities Planning and Design 3
EN 477 Operations Planning and Control 3
EN 488 Engineering Design Projects 3
EN 493 Senior Seminar 2
Technical Electives 3
General Education 6
__________
TOTAL 29

PRE-ENGINEERING PROGRAM

Students seeking to major in some area of engineering other than mechatronics or industrial engineering (for example, civil, electrical, or mechanical engineering) can complete at least 60 credits (two years) of courses that will transfer to other engineering schools. The courses should be selected in consultation with an Engineering faculty member and an advisor at the school to which the student plans to transfer. Generally recommended courses for a student planning to transfer to another engineering school include:

Courses Titles Credits
CHEM 121/L General Chemistry I/Lab 5
MATH 126 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I 5
MATH 224 Calculus & Analytic Geometry II 5
MATH 337 Differential Equations I 3
PHYS 221/L General Physics I/Lab 5
PHYS 222/L General Physics II/Lab 5
EN 101 Problem Solving for Engineers 4
EN 211 Engineering Mechanics I 3
EN 212 Engineering Mechanics II 3
EN 231/L Circuit Analysis/Lab 5
EN 321 Thermodynamics I 3
EN 324/L Materials Science & Engr/Lab 4

Humanities, Social Sciences & History courses

A student who intends to transfer elsewhere and then decides to stay at CSU-Pueblo will be able to count all of the above courses toward the BSE-Mechatronics or the BSIE.

MINOR IN ENGINEERING

The Engineering minor is appropriate for students who want to add knowledge of engineering to their study of a technical field, such as chemistry, mathematics, or physics. The courses in the minor have prerequisites (calculus and physics) that are not listed below.

Specific Requirements for the Minor in Engineering

Courses Titles Credits
EN 101 Problem Solving for Engineers 3
EN 103 Introduction to Engineering 2
EN 107 Engineering Graphics 2
EN 211 Engineering Mechanics I 3
EN 212 Engineering Mechanics II 3
EN 213/L Circuit Analysis I/Lab 5
EN 321 Thermodynamics 3
EN 343 Engineering Economy 3
__________
TOTAL 24

MINOR IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

The minor in Industrial Engineering is appropriate for students who want to add considerations of efficiency, quality and safety to their study of a technical field, such as chemistry, mathematics, or physics. Some of the courses in the minor have prerequisites (calculus and physics) that are not listed below.

Specific Requirements for the Minor in Industrial Engineering

Courses Titles Credits
EN 101 Problem Solving for Engineers 3
EN 103 Introduction to Engineering 2
EN 107 Engineering Graphics 2
EN 215 Intro to Indus & Sys Engineering 3
EN 343 Engineering Economy 3
 
PLUS three of the following:
EN 420 Simulation Experiments 4
EN 439 Time and Motion Studies 2
EN 440 Safety Engineering 3
EN 441 Manufacturing Processes 4
EN 443 Quality Control and Reliability 3
EN 471 Operations Research 3
EN 473 Computer Integrated Manufacturing 3
EN 475 Facilities Planning and Design 3
EN 477 Operations Planning and Control 3
_____________
TOTAL 21-24

Outcomes Assessment Activities

The BSE-Mechatronics and BSIE programs and the courses in each program are designed to support the Program Outcomes listed for each degree. Each program has an Advisory Board that meets annually and the input from those Boards is used to revise the programs. The Department also uses the following assessment activities:

  • During the final semester of study, all engineering students are required to demonstrate their ability to apply and integrate the skills and knowledge learned in the program by producing a capstone engineering design project. This project must incorporate subject material covered in two or more courses in the student’s major, involve knowledge or skill not learned in a class thus demonstrating the student’s ability to engage in life long learning, involve reflection on the impact of the proposed solution in a global and societal context, and be presented in written and oral reports to demonstrate the student’s communication skills.
     
  • All senior engineering studies are required to take the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam administered by the Colorado State Board of Registration for Professional Engineers, on a regularly scheduled examination date. Students must take the exam to be eligible to graduate, although the results of the exam will not affect GPA or graduation.

DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

Department Chair: Wolfgang Sauer

CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

Program Coordinator: Sylvester A. Kalevela

Faculty: Hirth, Kalevela, Mincic

The major in civil engineering technology leads to a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering Technology (BSCET) Degree.

The major is designed to produce competent field engineering technologists, surveyors, soil and concrete technologists, construction estimators, project managers and engineering design technologists, who have supervisory capabilities. The curriculum places emphasis on surveying, construction, design and estimating. The upper-division courses provide a broader and more detailed understanding in areas such as land surveying, water supply systems, architectural drafting and civil design projects. Managerial and supervisory capabilities are developed in the estimating and project management classes.

Students seeking a degree in civil engineering technology should have a mathematics/science background including algebra, geometry and trigonometry.

Program Goals

  • To prepare graduates in civil engineering technology to function effectively in the engineering, surveying or construction teams.
     
  • To provide our students with a broad based curriculum and quality instruction.
     
  • To maintain accreditation as defined by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

Expected Student Outcomes

General Requirements

  • Graduates are required to complete an approved program of study with a cumulative GPA of 2.000 or better in their major courses.
     
  • Graduates are required to demonstrate skill and knowledge in the areas of quantitative analysis and science by having a cumulative GPA of 2.000 or better in the mathematics and physics courses common to all ET programs.
     
  • Civil engineering technology majors are required to demonstrate the ability to solve problems appropriate to their discipline, acquire computer skills, and to complete a final senior-year technical project requiring an oral and written presentation.
     

Specific Requirements for the CET Major

It is expected that CET graduates should have the appropriate skills and knowledge regarding surveying and drafting. In addition, they should have a knowledge of basic construction materials along with the fundamentals of statics, strength of materials, hydraulics, structural analysis and design.

This program is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 050, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 347-7700.

Engineering Technology Core Courses

Courses Titles Credits
ET 101 Introduction to Engineering Technology 2
ET 202 Statics 3
ET 206 Strengths of Materials 4
ET 300 Project Planning, Scheduling and Management 3
____________
TOTAL 12

Civil Engineering Technology Courses

Courses Titles Credits
CET 102 Surveying I 3
CET 103 Surveying II 3
CET 115 Civil Drafting I 3
CET 116 Civil Drafting II 3
CET 203 Dynamics 1
CET 207 Construction Materials & Methods 3
CET 208 Concrete & Asphalt Materials 3
CET 215 Advanced Surveying I 3
CET 304 Construction Cost Estimating I 3
CET 305 Construction Cost Estimating II 3
CET 315 Soil Mechanics Technology 3
CET 316 Structural Analysis 3
CET 404 Structural Steel Design 3
CET 405 Reinforced Concrete Design 3
CET 411 Hydraulics 3
CET 455 Design Seminar 1
CET 456 Senior Project 3
Approved CET Electives 6
Approved Technical Electives 6
__________
TOTAL 56

Math, Science and Computer Courses

Courses Titles Credits
CIS 100 Intro to Word & Windows 1
CIS 104 Excel Spreadsheets 1
ET 226 Intro to Programming 2
CHEM 111 Principles of Chemistry
OR
GEOL 101 Earth Science 3
MATH 121 College Algebra 4
MATH 124 Pre-Calculus Math 5
MATH 126 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I
PHYS 201/L Principles of Physics I/Lab 4
PHYS 202/L Principles of Physics II/Lab 4
__________
TOTAL 29

Institutional and General Education

Please refer to the General Education Requirements in the undergraduate section of this catalog. For the knowledge component, CET majors need to take nine credits (three courses) each in the areas of Humanities (including SPCOM 103) and Social Sciences (including History). No additional courses are needed for Science and Technology.

Co-curricular Requirements

The faculty supports and encourages the involvement of engineering technology majors in at least one technical organization specific to each discipline and actively encourages student participation in such organizations.

Outcomes Assessment Activities

  • To be eligible for graduation, all civil engineering technology majors are required to take an examination. The results of the examination will be used in the evaluation of the program. Test results will have no effect on student’s GPA.
     
  • Graduates and their employers will be surveyed as to program satisfaction and job performance following their graduation.

Civil Engineering Technology Typical Schedule of Courses

Freshman - Fall

Courses Titles Credits
CET 102 Surveying I 3
CET 115 Civil Drafting I 3
CIS 100 Intro to Word & Windows 1
CIS 104 Excel Spreadsheets 1
ET 101 Introduction to Engineering Tech 2
MATH 121 College Algebra 4
__________
TOTAL 14

Freshman - Spring

Courses Titles Credits
CET 103 Surveying II 3
CET 116 Civil Drafting II 3
ENG 101 Composition I 3
MATH 124 Pre-Calculus Math 5
General Education, Knowledge Component 3
__________
TOTAL 17

Sophomore - Fall

Courses Titles Credits
CET 203 Dynamics 1
CET 207 Construction Materials & Methods 3
CET 215/216 Advanced Surveying I or II 3
ET 202 Statics 3
MATH 126 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 5
__________
TOTAL 15

Sophomore - Spring

Courses Titles Credits
CET 208 Concrete and Asphalt Materials 3
ET 206 Strength of Materials 4
ENG 102 Composition II 3
SPCOM 103 Speaking and Listening 3
General Education, Knowledge Component 3
__________
TOTAL 16

Junior - Fall

Courses Titles Credits
CET 304 Construction Cost Estimating I 3
CET 316 Structural Analysis 3
CHEM 111 Principles of Chemistry
OR
GEOL 101 Earth Sciences 3
PHYS 201/L Physics I w/Lab 4
General Education, Knowledge Component 3
__________
TOTAL 16

Junior - Spring

Courses Titles Credits
CET 305 Construction Cost Estimating II 3
CET 404 Structural Steel Design 3
ET 300 Project Planning, Scheduling & Management 3
PHYS 202/L Physics II w/Lab 4
General Education, Knowledge Component 3
__________
TOTAL 16

Senior - Fall

Courses Titles Credits
ET 226 Introduction to Programming 2
CET 405 Reinforced Concrete Design 3
CET 411 Hydraulics 3
CET 455 Design Seminar 1
CET Elective 3
General Education, Knowledge Component 3
__________
TOTAL 15

Senior - Spring

Courses Titles Credits
CET 315 Soil Mechanics Technology 3
CET 456 Senior Project 3
CET Elective 3
Technical Elective 3
Technical Elective 3
__________
TOTAL 15
Total required credit hours 124

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

Department Chair: Wolfgang Sauer

Faculty: Bailey, Sauer

A Bachelor of Science Degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology (BSMET) and a minor in MET are currently offered; but no new students will be admitted to the program major or minor.

Students currently enrolled in the MET major or minor program have four years to complete their program.

Program Goals

  • To prepare graduates in mechanical engineering technology to function effectively throughout the engineering spectrum.
     
  • To graduate students who can apply to theoretical foundations and skills of their discipline to solve practical engineering problems by using existing technology.
     
  • To maintain accreditation for all programs as defined by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

Expected Student Outcomes

General Requirements

  • Graduates are required to complete an approved program of study with a cumulative GPA of 2.000 or better in their major courses.
     
  • Graduates are required to demonstrate skill and knowledge in the areas of quantitative analysis and science by having a cumulative GPA of 2.000 or better in the mathematics/physics, and chemistry courses.
     
  • All mechanical engineering technology majors are required to demonstrate the ability to solve problems appropriate to their discipline, to use computer skills and to complete a final senior-year technical project requiring design and fabrication of a working model followed by written and oral presentations.
     
  • All mechanical engineering technology majors are required to study at least one computer language and to demonstrate their knowledge by applying computer programs to their daily class problems.

Specific Requirements for the MET Major

MET majors will obtain a knowledge of drafting, computer-aided design, materials, fluids, thermodynamics, all phases of manufacturing, robotics, and the design process. This program is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 050, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 347-7700.

Engineering Technology Core Courses

Courses Titles Credits
ET 101 Introduction to Engineering Technology 2
ET 202 Statics 3
ET 206 Strengths of Materials 4
ET 300 Project Planning, Scheduling and Management 3
______________
SUB-TOTAL 12

Mechanical Engineering Technology Courses

Courses Titles Credits
MET 105 It’s a Material World 4
MET 112 Mechanical Drafting (CAD) 3
MET 203 Manufacturing Processes I 4
MET 204 Manufacturing Processes II 3
MET 311 Quality Control 3
MET 322 Dynamics of Machinery 3
MET 341 Thermal and Fluid Principles I 3
MET 352 Design of Machine Elements 3
MET 356 Design Seminar 1
MET 361 Computer Integrated Manufacturing 3
MET 441 Thermal and Fluid Principles II 3
MET 442 Design of Energy Systems 3
MET 456 Senior Project 3
MET 460 Instrumentation and Control 3
Approved MET Electives 6
Approved Technical Electives 6
______________
SUB-TOTAL 54

Math, Science and Computer Courses

Courses Titles Credits
CHEM 111/L Principles of Chemistry/Lab 4
CIS 100 Intro to Word & Windows 1
CIS 104 Excel Spreadsheets 1
EET 250 Electrical Fundamentals and Applications 4
ET 226 Introduction to Programming 2
MATH 121 College Algebra 4
MATH 124 Pre-Calculus Math 5
MATH 126 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I 5
PHYS 201/L Principles of Physics I/Lab 4
PHYS 202/L Principle of Physics II/Lab 4
______________
SUB-TOTAL 34

Institutional and General Education

Please refer to the General Education Requirements in the undergraduate section of this catalog. For the knowledge component, MET majors need to take nine credits (three courses) each in the areas of Humanities (includes SPCOM 103) and Social Sciences (includes History). No additional courses are needed in Science and Technology.

Outcomes Assessment Activities

  • To be eligible for graduation, all mechanical engineering technology majors are required to take an examination. The results of the examination will be used in the evaluation of the program. The results for individual students will be kept in strict confidence; however, any individual student can obtain her/his results for advisory purposes. Test results will have no effect on student’s GPA. 
  • Graduates and their employers will be surveyed as to program satisfaction and job performance during the first, third and fifth years following graduation.

Mechanical Engineering Technology Typical Schedule of Courses

Freshman - Fall

Courses Titles Credits
CIS 100 Intro to Word & Windows 1
CIS 104 Excel Spreadsheets 1
ENG 101 Composition I 3
ET 101 Introduction to Engineering Tech.. 2
MATH 121 College Algebra 4
MET 105 It’s a Material World 4
__________
TOTAL 15

Freshman - Spring

Courses Titles Credits
CHEM 111/L Principles of Chemistry 4
ENG 102 Composition II 3
MATH 124 Pre-Calculus Math 5

MET 112 Computer-Aided Drafting 3
SPCOM 103 Speaking and Listening 3
__________
TOTAL 18

Sophomore - Fall

Courses Titles Credits
ET 202 Statics 3
ET 226 Introduction to Programming 2
MATH 126 Calculus & Analytic Geometry I 5
MET 203 Manufacturing Processes I 4
PHYS 201/L Physics I w/Lab 4
__________
TOTAL 18

Sophomore - Spring

Courses Titles Credits
ET 206 Strength of Materials 4
MATH 232 Calculus for Engineering Tech. II 3
MET 204 Manufacturing Processes II 3
PHYS 202/L Physics II w/Lab 4
General Education, Knowledge Component 3
__________
TOTAL 17

Junior - Fall

Courses Titles Credits
EET 250 Electrical Fundamentals 4
MET 322 Dynamics of Machinery 3
MET 341 Thermal and Fluids Principles I 3
MET 352 Design of Machine Elements 3
General Education, Knowledge Component 3
__________
TOTAL 16

Junior - Spring

Courses Titles Credits
ET 300 Project Planning, Scheduling and Management 3
MET 311 Quality Control 3
MET 356 Basic Design Principles 2
MET 441 Thermal and Fluids Principles II 3
Technical Elective 3
General Education, Knowledge Component 3
__________
TOTAL 17

Senior - Fall

Courses Titles Credits
MET 442 Design of Energy Systems 2
MET 456 Senior Project 3
MET 460 Instrumentation and Control 3
MET Elective 3
General Education, Knowledge Component 3
__________
TOTAL 14

Senior - Spring

Courses Titles Credits
MET 361 Computer Integrated Manufacturing 3
MET Elective 3
Technical Elective 3
General Education, Knowledge Component 3
__________
TOTAL 12
Total required credit hours 124

MET MINOR

A minor in MET is currently offered; but no new students are being accepted into the minor program.

The MET minor is designed for students in the math, science, and technical areas of study. Their background in math and physics is essential to understanding the technical courses. Students from other areas of study may have to take additional courses in math and physics.

Mechanical Engineering Technology Core:

Courses Titles Credits
ET 202 Statics 3
ET 206 Strength of Materials 4
MET 105 It’s a Material World 4
MET 112 Computer-aided Drafting 3
MET 203 Manufacturing Processes I 4
MET Elective 3
______________
SUB-TOTAL 21

This curriculum gives the student a background in materials, structures, manufacturing, and one course to fit the student’s interest and aspirations.

EXERCISE SCIENCE, HEALTH PROMOTION, AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT

Department Chair: Foust
Faculty: L. Clark, R. Clark, Conroy, Dallam, Rochester, Smith, Stuyt

The mission of the Department of Exercise Science, Health Promotion, and Recreation is to prepare students for professional positions and leadership roles in Exercise Science, Health Promotion, and Recreation through experiential educational opportunities that promote wellness and healthy lifestyles. Graduates earn a Bachelor of Science degree in Exercise Science, Health Promotion, and Recreation (EXHPR).

The BS in Exercise Science, Health Promtion, and Recreation (EXHPR) program currently includes six emphases of study:

  • Athletic Training
  • General Exercise Science
  • Health Promotion Wellness
  • Physical Education K-12 Teacher Preparation
  • Community/Commercial Recreation
  • Outdoor Adventure Leadership

Department Goals

  • Provide students with a broad-based theoretical foundation supported by laboratory and field experiences that allow individual observations, inferences, and hands-on mastery of skills related to the promotion of wellness and healthy lifestyles.
     
  • Provide effective professional learning opportunities based on the following concepts: Information Retrieval, Conceptual Understanding, Information Analysis, Critical Thinking, Development of Relevant Skill, and Practical Application of Ideas.
     
  • Prepare students to be life-long learners and to enhance the well-being of the community they dwell in.
     
  • Prepare students to become productive, accountable, ethical, and responsible professionals.
     
  • Prepare students to enter graduate or professional schools.

Expected Student Outcomes

General Requirements:

All departmental Majors are required to:

  • Complete an emphasis of study with a cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher;
     
  • Earn a minimum grade of a “C-” in all prerequisite and major courses;
     
  • Repeat prerequisite and major courses with a grade of “D” or lower until a grade of “C-” or higher is achieved; and
     
  • Earn a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher in required English and speech communication courses.
     

Exercise Science and Health Promotion graduates are expected to:

  • Demonstrate understanding of the philosophy and historical basis of the disciplines of exercise science and health promotion;
     
  • Exhibit the ability to read and interpret scientific journal articles in exercise science and health promotion with an understanding of the scientific methods, statistics, and design of the studies;
     
  • Exhibit knowledge of the structure and function of the human organism both at rest and during movement;
     
  • Display knowledge and skill related to first aid and the care/prevention of injuries occurring during physical activity;
     
  • Demonstrate skills and knowledge germane to exercise assessment, programming and leadership;
     
  • Exhibit knowledge in the basic principles of health with emphasis on the application of nutrition and personal fitness concepts in attaining personal wellness; and
     
  • Exhibit knowledge of the underlying kinesiological principles governing human movement.

Upon completion of the EXHP core program requirements, a student will be eligible to sit for a variety of nationally recognized certification exams including those offered by the American College of Sports Medicine ("Health/Fitness Instructor", "Personal Trainer", and Exercise Leader"), the American Council on Exercise ("Personal Trainer", and "Aerobics Instructor"), the Aerobics and Fitness Association of America ("Personal Trainer", and "Aerobics Instructor"), the National Strength and Conditioning Association ("Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist").

The BS degree in EXHPR prepares program graduates for professional positions in worksite, clinical, school, fitness government and community settings.

  • Graduates of the Athletic Training emphasis who also complete appropriate clinical experience can sit for the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Board of Certification (NATABOC) exam to become a certified Athletic Trainer. Athletic Trainers are employed in high school, university/college, clinical, corporate, professional sports, and military settings.
     
  • Graduates of the General Exercise Science coursework are prepared for exercise and fitness related professional positions. This emphasis is an excellent selection for students preparing for advanced study in fields such as exercise physiology, allied health, or sport administration.
     
  • Graduates of the Health Promotion/Wellness emphasis are eligible to sit for the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing exam to become a Certified Health Education Specialist. Health Promotion/Wellness graduates can find employment in employee wellness, community health, government and volunteer health agencies, clinical and managed care settings.
     
  • Graduates of the Physical Education K-12 Teacher Preparation emphasis who also complete the Teacher Education program, and receive a passing score on the Colorado Department of Education P.L.A.C.E. test are eligible to receive Teacher Licensure in the State of Colorado. Licensed graduates can find physical education teaching positions in both the public and private school settings.

Two minors are currently available in Exercise Science and Health Promotion.

  • The Exercise Science and Health Promotion minor is available to non-EXHP majors. This minor is ideal for Biology majors in the pre-physical therapy, pre-medicine, or pre-chiropractic emphasis areas of study or any student interested in Exercise Science and Health Promotion.
     
  • The Coaching minor is also available to all students and is a great choice for students aspiring to coach.

Specific Requirements for the Exercise Science, Health Promotion Emphases:

  • Athletic Training
  • General Exercise Science
  • Health Promotion/Wellness
  • Physical Education
  • K-12 Teacher Preparation

Core Course Requirements for EXHP Emphasis Areas

Courses Titles Credits
EXHP 101 Introduction to EXHPR 3
BIOL 112 Nutrition 3
EXHP 162 Personal Health 3
EXHP 162L Personal Health Lab 1
EXHP 222 Behavior Facilitation 3
EXHP 343 Measurement and Evaluation 3
EXHP 344 Exercise Physiology 3
EXHP 344L Exercise Physiology Lab 1
EXHP 364 Kinesiology 3
EXHP 461 Managing Programs in EXHPR 3

Emphasis Area Course Requirements

Athletic Training Education Program
http://ceeps.colostate-pueblo.edu/exhpr/athletic_training.htm

Courses Titles Credits
EXHP 232 First Aid 3
EXHP 260 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries 3
EXHP 279 Practicum in Athletic Training I 1
EXHP 289 Practicum in Athletic Training II 1
EXHP 323 Functional Exercise Training 2
EXHP 330 Lower Extremity Evaluation 3
EXHP 331 Upper Extremity Evaluation 3
EXHP 332 Head, Neck and Spine Evaluation 3
EXHP 339 Clinical Pathology & Assessment 3
EXHP 379 Practicum in Athletic Training III 1
EXHP 389 Practicum in Athletic Training IV 1
EXHP 430 Therapeutic Modalities 3
EXHP 431 Therapeutic Exercise 3
EXHP 436 Exercise Assessment & Leadership 3
EXHP 443 Administration in Athletic Training 3
EXHP 479 Practicum in Athletic Training V 1
EXHP 489 Senior Practicum in Athletic Training 1
EXHP 494 NATA Test Preparation 1
EXHP 419 Athletic Training Field Experience 4
BIOL 223 Anatomy and Physiology I 3
BIOL 223L Anatomy and Physiology I Lab 1
BIOL 224 Anatomy and Physiology II 3
BIOL 224L Anatomy and Physiology II Lab 1
CIS 100 Intro to Word and Windows 1
CIS 103 Power Point and the Web 1
CIS 104 Excel Spreadsheets 1
MATH 121 College Algebra 4
PSYCH 151 Intro to Human Development 3
SPCOM 103 Speaking and Listening 3

Accreditation

The Colorado State University-Pueblo Athletic Training Education Program is accredited by the Commission on the Accreditation of Allied-Health Education Programs (CAAHEP).

Competitive Admission Policy

The Athletic Training Education Program is highly competitive. Entry into the curriculum is not guaranteed upon completion of the pre-professional phase (the first two years of coursework). The determining factors include the success of the pre-professional experience, meeting all academic prerequisites, and number of students enrolled in the program. The number of students admitted into the program varies from year to year.

Application Criteria/Procedure

The following criteria must be met to be considered for admission into the Colorado State University-Pueblo Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP)

  • Completion of the Colorado State University-Pueblo Athletic Training Education Application. The student can obtain the application form from the program director. Completed applications are due to the program director by March 1st;
     
  • Completion of EXHP 279, 232, 260, and BIOL 223, 223L, 224, 224L. (EXHP 232 and 260 with a B or higher, all others with a C or higher grade);
     
  • An overall grade point average of 2.6 or higher;
     
  • A declared Exercise Science, Health Promotion, and Recreation major;
     
  • Proof of current First Aid and CPR for Professional Rescuer Certification;
     
  • Documentation of observation hours and appropriate evaluation forms (from off-campus observation and EXHP 279 and 289);
     
  • Complete interview with ATEP Director and Clinical Instructors; and
     
  • NATA membership is highly recommended but not required.
     

The Athletic Training Education Program faculty/staff will make the final decisions regarding acceptance into the program based upon the student’s total rankings on the admission criteria and available slots in the program. All applying students will receive written notification from the program director indicating their acceptance or denial into the Athletic Training Education Program.

Transfer Students

Students wishing to transfer to the Colorado State University-Pueblo Athletic Training Education Program must satisfy the above criteria. According to accreditation guidelines any courses containing competency or proficiency evaluation can not be accepted as transfer credits, unless an affiliate site agreement exists between the institution and CSU-Pueblo. Transfer students must understand that application to the athletic training education program occurs once a year during the fall semester only. Once accepted in the program students must complete 5 semesters in order to be eligible for graduation.

Requirements Upon Program Acceptance

The following are required:

  • Completion of program approved physical exam.
     
  • Completion of the program’s Technical Standards Form.
     
  • Completion of a Tuberculosis skin test and Hepatitis B vaccination and documentation or Hepatitis B declination form.
     
  • Purchase of athletic training student liability insurance.
     
  • Proof of medical insurance.
     
  • Completion of “Background Check” will be required prior to going to any affiliated sites for clinical experience.
     
  • The athletic training student will need their own personal transportation for travel to get to off-campus clinical sites.

Retention Criteria

In order to remain in the Athletic Training Education Program the student must:

  • Maintain a 2.6 or higher overall GPA;
     
  • Maintain 3.0 GPA in all athletic training courses, including grades of no less than a B in EXHP 379, 389, 479, and 489;
     
  • Maintain athletic training student liability insurance; and
     
  • Maintain Professional Rescuer First Aid and CPR with AED certification.
     

Outcome Assessment Activities for Athletic Training Emphasis

In addition to assessment, which is inherent in the core/emphasis requirements, prior to receiving clearance for graduation, each General Exercise Science major must complete:

  • Departmental exit survey,
     
  • Successful completion of all NATABOC competencies and proficiencies, and
     
  • An exit comprehensive examination.

General Exercise Science

Courses Titles Credits
EXHP 201 Drugs and Healthy Lifestyles 3
EXHP 232 First Aid 2
EXHP 260 Care and Prevention of Injuries 3
EXHP 436 Exercise Assessment & Leadership 3
EXHP 494 Field Experience 6
OR
EXHP 498 Internship 12
BIOL 223 Anatomy and Physiology I 3
BIOL 223L Anatomy and Physiology I Lab 1
BIOL 224 Anatomy and Physiology II 3
BIOL 224L Anatomy and Physiology II Lab 1
CIS 100 Intro to Word and Windows 1
CIS 103 Power Point and the Web 1
CIS 104 Excel Spreadsheets 1
MATH 121 College Algebra 4
PSYCH 151 Intro to Human Development 3
SPCOM 103 Speaking and Listening 3

12-18 credits from the following with a minimum of 4-10 upper division:

REC 102 Mountain Orientation 2
REC 103 Winter Orientation 2
REC 104 Desert Orientation 2
REC 105 Canyon Orientation 2
EXHP 106L Martial Arts and Self-Defense 1
EXHP 109L Volleyball 1
EXHP 110L Weight Training 1
EXHP 111 Commitment to Academic Excellence 1
EXHP 113L Whiteboard Boating 1
EXHP 115L Skiing 1
EXHP 116L Camping 1
EXHP 117L Backpacking 1
EXHP 120L Aerobics 1
EXHP 175L Racquetball 1
EXHP 176L Lifeguard Training 1
PSYCH 205 Intro to Sports Psychology 3
EXHP 233 History and Principles of PE and Recreation 2
EXHP 243 Methods of Rhythmic Activities 2
EXHP 245 Motor Learning and Development 3
REC 249 Challenge Course Leadership 2
EXHP 288 Health Promotion Practicum 3
EXHP 323 Functional Exercise Training 2
EXHP 345 Methods/Physical Act. & Games I 2
EXHP 346 Methods Physical Act. & Games II 2
EXHP 348 Methods of Individual and Dual Sports 3
REC 350 Leadership and Ethics 3
REC 375 Research & Eval of Recreation 3
EXHP 382 Lifestyle Disease Risk Reduction 3
EXHP 464 Adapted Physical Education 3
EXHP 470 Methods of Coaching and Officiating 3
EXHP 473 Coaching Certification Clinic 1
EXHP 485 Methods in Health Promotion 3
EXHP 494 Field Experience 1-5
EXHP 498 Internship 12

Outcome Assessment Activities for General Exercise Science Emphasis

In addition to assessment, which is inherent in the core/emphasis requirements, prior to receiving clearance for graduation, each General Exercise Science major must complete:

  • Comprehensive exit exam,
     
  • Departmental exit survey, and
     
  • Prepare a portfolio which includes:
  1. A current copy of academic transcripts,
  2. Cover letter and resume,
  3. Career vision, mission, goal and/or philosophy statement,
  4. Self-evaluation of proficiency including strengths and weaknesses,
  5. At least 4 samples of classroom and practical work from EXHPR and other relevant courses such as: research papers, statistical analysis, course projects, literature reviews, etc.,
  6. Evidence of participation in on- and/or off-campus interpersonal and leadership skill building co-curricular activities, and
  7. Letters of recommendation from professionals on- and off-campus.

Health Promotion/Wellness
http://ceeps.colostate-pueblo.edu/exhpr/health_promotion.htm

Courses Titles Credits
EXHP 201 Drugs and Healthy Lifestyles 3
EXHP 232 First Aid 2
EXHP 288 Health Promotion Practicum 3
EXHP 323 Functional Exercise Training 2
EXHP 336 Community Health 3
EXHP 382 Lifestyle Disease Risk Reduction 3
EXHP 436 Exercise Assessment & Leadership 3
EXHP 485 Methods in Health Promotion 3
EXHP 487 HP Program Planning/Evaluation 4
EXHP 498 Internship 12
BIOL 223 Anatomy and Physiology I 3
BIOL 223L Anatomy and Physiology I Lab 1
BIOL 224 Anatomy and Physiology II 3
BIOL 224L Anatomy and Physiology II Lab 1
CIS 100 Intro to Word and Windows 1
CIS 103 Power Point and the Web 1
CIS 104 Excel Spreadsheets 1
MATH 121 College Algebra 4
MCCNM 216 Advertising 3
OR
MCCNM 240 Public Relations 3
OR
MKTG 340 Principles of Marketing 3
PSYCH 151 Intro to Human Development 3
SPCOM 103 Speaking and Listening 3

Outcomes Assessment Activities for Health Promotion/Wellness Emphasis

In addition to assessment, which is inherent in the core/emphasis requirements, prior to receiving clearance for graduation, each Health Promotion/Wellness major must complete:

  • Comprehensive exit exam
     
  • Departmental exit survey
     
  • Prepare a portfolio which includes:
  1. A current copy of academic transcripts
     
  2. Cover letter and resume
     
  3. Career vision, mission, goal and/or philosophy statement
     
  4. Self-evaluation of proficiency including strengths and weaknesses
     
  5. At least four samples of classroom and practical work from EXHPR and other relevant courses such as: research papers, statistical analysis, course projects, literature reviews, etc.
     
  6. Evidence of participation in on- and/or off-campus interpersonal and leadership skill building co-curricular activities
     
  7. Letters of recommendation from professionals and on-and off-campus

Physical Education K-12 Teacher Preparation
http://ceeps.colostate-pueblo.edu/exhpr/k_12_physical_ed.htm

Courses Titles Credits
EXHP 232 First Aid 2
EXHP 233 History and Principles of PE 2
EXHP 243 Methods of Rhythmic Activities 2
EXHP 245 Motor Learning and Development 3
EXHP 260 Care & Prevention of Athletic Injuries 3
EXHP 345 Methods of Physical Activities And Games I 2
EXHP 346 Methods Physical Activities & Games II 2
EXHP 348 Methods of Individual/Dual Activities 3
EXHP 351 Methods of Teaching Elementary Physical Education 3
EXHP 465 Adapted Physical Education 3
EXHP 478 Methods of Teaching Secondary Physical Education 3

Two credits from the following:

EXHP 113L Whitewater Boating 1
EXHP 114L Basic Mountaineering Tech 1
EXHP 115L Skiing 1
EXHP 116L Camping 1
EXHP 117L Backpacking 1
REC 102 Mountain Orientation 2
REC 103 Winter Orientation 2
REC 104 Desert Orientation 2
REC 105 Canyon Orientation 2
REC 249 Challenge Course Leadership 2

One credit from the following:

EXHP 106L Martial Arts and Self-Defense 1
EXHP 109L Volleyball 1
EXHP 110L Weight Training 1
EXHP 119L Walking for Fitness 1
EXHP 120L Aerobics 1
EXHP 143L Folk, Square, and Ballroom Dance 1
EXHP 174L Tennis 1
EXHP 175L Racquetball 1
EXHP 473 Coaching Certification Clinic 1

One Credit from the following:

EXHP 146L Beginning Swimming 1
EXHP 176L Lifeguard Training 1
EXHP 276L Water Safety Instructor Certification 2

For teaching endorsement requirements, see the Teacher Education Program section of this catalog.

Outcome Assessment Activities for Physical Education K-12 Teacher Preparation Emphasis

In addition to assessment, which is inherent in the core/emphasis requirements, prior to receiving clearance for graduation, each K-12 Teacher Preparation major must complete:

  • Departmental exit survey
     
  • Proficiency in all Colorado and CSU-Pueblo Teacher Education Standards
     
  • A high quality teacher work sample
     
  • A high quality student teaching portfolio
     
  • A passing grade on the Physical Education P.L.A.C.E. Certification Exam

Exercise Science and Health Promotion Minors

Program Goals

  • Provide coursework that complements a major course of study.
     
  • Enhance the student’s employment market-ability and acceptance into graduate/professional school.

Expected Student Outcomes

Exercise Science and Health Promotion minors will:

  • Complete the credit hour requirement of the minor;
     
  • Complete all required coursework with a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher;
     
  • Earn a minimum grade of “C-” in all minor courses; and
     
  • Repeat minor courses with a grade of “D” or lower until a grade of “C-” or higher is achieved.

Specific Requirements for Exercise Science and Health Promotion Minors:

Coaching

Courses Titles Credits
BIOL 112 Nutrition 3
EXHP 260 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries 3
EXHP 364 Kinesiology 3
EXHP 470 Methods of Coaching & Officiating 3
EXHP 473 Coaching Certification Clinic 1
EXHP Methods of coaching courses 4
and/or
EXHP 494 Field Experience (1-5 VAR)
PSYCH 205 Intro to Sports Psych 3
__________
TOTAL 20

Exercise Science and Health Promotion (for Non-EXHPR Majors)
 

Courses Titles Credits
EXHP 101 Introduction to Exercise Science and Health Promotion 3
BIOL 112 Nutrition 3
EXHP 162 Personal Health 3
Two credits from the following list 2
REC 102 Mountain Orientation 2
REC 103 Winter Orientation 2
REC 104 Desert Orientation 2
EXHP 106L Martial Arts and Self-Defense 1
EXHP 109L Volleyball 1
EXHP 110L Weight Training 1
EXHP 113L Whiteboard Boating 1
EXHP 115L Skiing 1
EXHP 116L Camping 1
EXHP 117L Backpacking 1
EXHP 119L Walking for Fitness 1
EXHP 120L Aerobics 1
EXHP 174L Tennis 1
EXHP 175L Racquetball 1
EXHP 176L Lifeguard Training 1
EXHP 300 or higher level student electives 9
__________
TOTAL 20

RECREATION

The Recreation program consists of two emphases of study:

  • Community/Commercial
     
  • Outdoor Adventure Leadership

Completion of both emphases of study prepares graduates to work in positions of leadership in a variety of recreational service agencies. Prospective employers include parks and recreation departments at the city, county, district, and state levels as well as voluntary youth agencies such as the YWCA/YMCA, boys’ and girls’ clubs and scouting. Other areas of employment include recreation programs in the military, hospital, commercial, and worksite settings. Students completing the Community/Commercial emphasis are eligible to sit for the Certified Park and Recreation Professional (CPRP) and after completing two additional courses, the Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist (CTRS) Certification Exams.

  • A minor in Recreation is available to all students. The minor is ideal for those majoring in EXHPR, social work, sociology, and biology as well as for students aspiring to teach in public/private schools.

Recreation Emphasis Goals

  • Provide students with a broad-based theoretical foundation supported by field experiences that facilitate individual observations, inferences, and hands-on mastery of skills related to the field of recreation.
     
  • Prepare students to be life-long learners.
     
  • Prepare students to become productive, accountable, ethical and responsible professionals.
     
  • Prepare students to enter graduate or professional schools.

Recreation graduates are expected to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the history and philosophy of leisure, recreation, and parks in western society;
     
  • Exhibit awareness of the scope of the leisure services delivery spectrum, including public, private, and non-profit sector service providers in major specializations of leisure, recreation, and parks;
     
  • Demonstrate an understanding of and ability to conduct various recreation program planning phases including client assessment, goal setting, activity analysis/selection, program management and evaluation;
     
  • Demonstrate knowledge and the skills involved in a recreation leadership function including interpersonal communication, trust building, power and influence, interpersonal conflict and its resolution, teaching and transference, and decision making;
     
  • Exhibit an awareness of the special populations that recreation programs and resources must accommodate, the implications of programming for each population, and specific agencies/legislation currently providing services for each population;
     
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the principal federal and state agencies providing parks and resource-based recreation opportunities in the United States including the primary management policies and challenges;
     
  • Demonstrate competencies in applying principles of management to recreation services and resources, including the organization of agencies, personnel, fiscal/risk management, and marketing;
     
  • Exhibit an understanding of philosophies, history, curricular elements, and settings for outdoor education in the United States;
     
  • Exhibit an awareness of key professional organizations and current trends/issues in the field of recreation and how to obtain matching employment;
     
  • Demonstrate the ability to read and interpret professional journal articles relevant to recreation and to carry out and report on new, original research;
     
  • Understand the principles of recreation facility design, construction and management.

Specific Requirements for the Recreation Emphasis:

Core Course Requirements for the Recreation Emphasis

Courses   Titles Credits
EXHP 101 Introduction to EXHPR 3
REC 240 Recreation Program Design 3
REC 280 Foundations of TR 3
REC 350 Leadership & Ethics 3
REC 360 Teaching Exp Ed in Outdoors 3
REC 375 Research & Eval of REC 3
REC 389 Practicum 3
EXHP 461 Managing Program in EXHPR 3
REC 493 Seminar 2
REC 498 Internship 12

Emphasis Course Requirements

Outdoor Adventure Leadership
http://ceeps.colostate-pueblo.edu/exhpr/outdoor_adventure _education.htm

Courses Titles Credits
EXHP 113L- 117L Outdoor Skills (select 4 of 5) 4
REC 102- 105 Orientations (select 3 of 4) 6
REC 249 Challenge Course Leadership 2
REC 270 Outdoor Leadership I 2
REC 370 Outdoor Leadership II 2
REC 470 Wilderness First Responder 2
REC 484 Outdoor Resources & Management 3

Community/Commercial Recreation
http://ceeps.colostate-pueblo.edu/exhpr/community_ commercial_rec.htm

Courses Titles Credits
REC 250 Commercial Recreation and Tourism 3
REC 485 Recreation Facility Design and Management 3
MCCNM 216 Advertising 3
MCCNM 240 Public Relations 3
MGMT 201 Principles of Management 3
MGMT 318 Human Resource Management 3
MKTG 340 Principles of Marketing 3

Outcomes Assessment Activities

In addition to assessment, which is inherent in the core/allied/methods coursework requirements, prior to receiving clearance for graduation, each Recreation major must complete:

  • A departmental exit survey
  • A comprehensive exit examination
  • A portfolio that includes:
  1. A current copy of academic transcripts and resume;
  2. Samples of research/term papers, projects, etc., from Recreation and other relevant courses;
  3. Evidence of participation in on- and/or off-campus interpersonal and leadership skill building co-curricular activities;
  4. and Letters of recommendation from professionals on-and-off campus.

Recreation Minor Program Goals

  • Provide coursework that complements a major course of study.
     
  • Enhance the student’s employment marketability and acceptance into graduate/professional school.

Expected Student Outcomes

Recreation minors will:

  • Complete the credit hour requirement of the minor;
     
  • Complete all required coursework with a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher;
     
  • Earn a minimum grade of a “C-” in all minor courses;
     
  • Repeat minor courses with a grade of “D” or lower until a grade of “C-” or higher is achieved;

Recreation Minor: Specific Requirements

Courses Titles Credits
EXHP 101 Introduction to EXHPR 3
EXHP 461 Managing Programs in EXHPR 3
REC 240 Recreation Program Design 3
REC 280 Foundations of TR 3
REC 360 Teaching Exp Ed in Outdoors 3
REC 375 Research & Eval of REC 3
REC 389 Practicum 3
__________
TOTAL 21

NURSING DEPARTMENT

Department Chair: Johnston
Undergraduate Coordinator: Glaublinsklee
Faculty: Chrisman, Coram, Cullen, DePalma, Farnworth, Foster, Janos, Martinez, Miller, Rodriguez, Sciotte, Speaks, Stueve, Waggoner

Department Mission

As the Southeastern Colorado Center for Nursing, the Department of Nursing’s mission is to prepare today’s nursing student to be tomorrow’s competent and caring nurse.

Department Goals

The Nursing Department will:

  • Provide quality learning experiences for nursing students that prepare graduates for practice as competent, caring, ethical, and accountable nurses.
     
  • Maintain approval of the Colorado Board of Nursing and national accrediting agencies.
     
  • Facilitate achievement of baccalaureate and graduate nursing education.
     
  • Serve as the regional nursing education center for southern Colorado, collaborating with local and regional health care agencies by maintaining a program curriculum congruent with the expectations of the agencies, University, and students.

Our Accreditation

The CSU-Pueblo Department of Nursing baccalaureate educational program is fully approved by the Colorado Board of Nursing and is accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC), 61 Broadway, New York, NY 10006.

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program

The Colorado State University-Pueblo Department of Nursing offers an undergraduate program that confers a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN). The undergraduate program offers several tracks for the basic nursing student (Basic BSN), the registered nurse (RN-BSN), licensed practical nurse (LPN-BSN), second degree students (BA/BS-BSN), and the paramedic (Paramedic-BSN) to obtain their Baccalaureate of Science in Nursing degree (BSN). The Basic BSN is a track developed for the student who has completed prerequisite courses and has no degree, certificate or license. The RN-BSN track is developed for an associate degree or diploma nurse with a license to complete their BSN. The student with another baccalaureate or masters degree may apply to the BA/BS-BSN track or the Basic BSN. Licensed practical nurses that have a nursing license or completed an accredited program may apply for the LPN-BSN or Basic BSN track. The paramedic may elect to apply for the Paramedic-BSN or Basic BSN track. The BSN program also offers an elective concentrated clinical practicum in nursing. The elective practicum allows the student to explore their passion in clinical practice. Undergraduate nursing students may elect to take nursing graduate courses during their senior year.

Undergraduate Program Goals

The program will:

  • Explore the application of human needs providing culturally competent care for clients in a variety of settings.
     
  • Provide multiple opportunities for the student to engage in caring behaviors while applying the nursing process.
     
  • Anticipate changes in health care environment and respond by redefining, changing, and maintaining competencies throughout one’s practice life through the role modeling of professional behavior.
     
  • Develop partnerships and collaborations to improve the public health and health care system through evidence based practice.
     
  • Develop a student centered learning environment with the application of effective communication, technology and quality improvement processes that promote safe clinical practice.

Expected Undergraduate Student Outcomes

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing Major is designed to prepare the graduate to:

  • Practice nursing using a human needs framework incorporating multi-disciplinary theories.
     
  • Demonstrate entry level competence in providing nursing care to individuals, families, groups and communities.
     
  • Employ critical thinking utilizing the nursing process and evidenced based practice to manage client care.
     
  • Incorporate caring (commitment, compassion, conscience, competence, confidence, comportment) into professional nursing practice.
     
  • Integrate nursing roles for professional nurses.
     
  • Facilitate effective, purposeful communication between self and others (peers, clients, and other professionals) to promote common goals in diverse health care settings.
     
  • Evaluate the influence of the complex interactions of multiple environmental factors on the formulation of a plan to meet the health and safety needs of individuals, families, and communities.
     
  • Demonstrate behaviors and clinical competencies that reflect professional standards and accountability congruent with the national organizations including the American Nurses’ Association (ANA) Code of Ethics and the State Nurse Practice Acts in the provision of culturally competent nursing care to clients.

Outcome Assessments

The outcome assessments will be evaluated through or by:

  • Assessment of clinical competencies through multiple strategies including simulations.
     
  • Individual and course evaluations including the standardized testing program.
     
  • An end of program evaluation survey and a graduate follow up survey of nursing graduates and their employers one year and five years after graduation.
     
  • National Certification and/or Licensure Examination (NCLEX) required of graduates prior to professional nursing practice as a registered nurse.
     
  • A survey of graduate employment and graduation rates.

Undergraduate Admission Policies and Procedures

Students are responsible for all undergraduate admissions policies and procedures as outlined in the Academic Policies section of this catalog.

Undergraduate Admission Requirements

Admission to the University does not imply acceptance to the nursing program. The undergraduate program is very competitive and applicants are ranked based on their GPA for the general education and prerequisites required by the program. Consideration is given to the percentage of prerequisites and general education courses completed and by the deadline (May 25). Students will be notified in writing by September 1st of their admission status to the program.

For the basic nursing student admission, requirements are a minimum GPA of 2.75 for all required general education and prerequisites. All prerequisites must be passed with a C or better and be completed prior to taking NSG 232/232L. All general education must be completed prior to taking NSG 232/232L.

Students for whom English is a second language must have a TOFEL of 550 or have completed the University requirements of English and Speech skills.

Undergraduate Nursing Program Application Process

Applications to the nursing program may be obtained at http://ceeps.colostate-pueblo.edu/nursing or in the nursing department by calling 549-2401 or email at nursing@colostate-pueblo.edu. The completed applications must be submitted to the nursing department prior to the scheduled deadline. Incomplete applications will not be processed. Please contact the department if you have any questions regarding your application.

For the basic student admission, the student needs to be admitted to CSU-Pueblo first, and then submit a separate application to the nursing program by May 25 the year prior to the spring semester they plan to start the program. During the pre-nursing phase of the application process students will be advised by the pre-nursing advisor who can be contacted at the number above.

After Admission Requirements

  • Before a student starts their nursing sequence they must:
     
  • Return receipt for program acceptance before November 1st.
     
  • Have by Colorado Law (House bill 97-1084) a drug screen and fingerprint background check by the Pueblo County Sheriff’s Office located at CSU-Pueblo prior to beginning the nursing major or during nursing orientation.
     
  • All students must be currently certified in CPR (Health Care Provider-C or equivalent).
     
  • Have a student health physical form filed with the Department and must have all immunizations current, including the Hepatitis B series, Measles, Mumps and Rubella and a 2 step TB test.
     
  • Attend a mandatory nursing orientation.
     
  • Submit current unofficial transcripts showing completion of all prerequisite and general education classes.

Acceptance of Transfer Credit

Transfer credit will be awarded per the published Academic Policies section of this catalog. Credit will be awarded for a course in which a grade of C or better was earned. Grades of C- are not accepted for any nursing prerequisite.

Time Limits

Nursing courses completed five (5) or more years before the date of graduation, either at CSU-Pueblo or at some other institution, will not be accepted as satisfying graduation requirements without the approval of the student’s undergraduate program coordinator and department chair. Accelerated, full-time degree plans are provided in the following sections. Part-time degree plans are also available. Degree plans are developed with the student and their advisor or undergraduate program coordinator. All degree plans must be approved by the Student Affairs and Faculty Advocacy Committee.

Academic Standards

Students are responsible for all academic standards policies per the published Academic Policies section of this catalog. In addition to those policies, the following applies:

  • Students must maintain a 2.75 (3.0 accelerated track and paramedic) cumulative nursing GPA for progression in the program. Failure to comply may result in dismissal from the program.
     
  • Students must complete all nursing courses with a grade of C (not a C-) or better. Failure of two nursing courses or the same course twice will result in dismissal from the program and not eligible for readmission.

Graduation Requirement

The BSN degree will be granted to undergraduate nursing degree-seeking students who meet all of the published requirements plus the additional requirements below:

  • Have a cumulative nursing GPA of 2.75 (3.0 accelerated track and paramedic) or better at graduation. All nursing courses and required prerequisite courses must be passed with a C or better. Anything less than a C in required courses will not be applied toward graduation.
     
  • Complete the program’s minimum number of hours of approved course work within five years.
     
  • Pass all required standardized exams at the national level.

Licensure Examinations and Certification Examinations

Students completing:

  • All junior courses and the national standardized tests qualify to take the national licensure examination for the practical nurse.
     
  • All of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing requirements and the national standardized exams qualify for the registered nurse licensure.
     
  • A designed plan developed in their elective passion track may qualify for certification examinations.

The Basic Bachelor of Science in Nursing Track (Basic BSN)

The Basic BSN program assists the new student who has completed their prerequisite courses to enter a dynamic ever-changing profession of nursing by completing their BSN degree requirements. The program is based on a philosophical approach to nursing that includes the holistic synthesis of person, health and environment. The Colorado State University-Pueblo offers the ideal foundation for the development of the professional nurse.

Program of Study

The student must develop a program of study with the pre-nursing advisor. The pre-nursing advisor is notified once the student has declared their major. The student must contact their pre-nursing advisor to develop their program plan as soon as possible. The plan will include 43 credit hours of required prerequisite courses and 77 credit hours of nursing courses for a total of 120 credit hours. All nursing courses must be passed with a C or better. Basic students enrolled in the program must maintain a 2.75 GPA in order to progress.

Hybrid Courses (50% online and 50% on campus)

A hybrid course is a combination classroom/Internet course. Students meet 50% of the time in a classroom at a regularly-scheduled time and place, the rest of your time is spent online. Both parts of the course, classroom attendance and online work, are mandatory.

Students are expected to subscribe to an email discussion list, communicate on a regular basis with your instructor, and collaborate extensively with others in your class.

In order to take a hybrid course, the student must have access to a computer so you can send and receive email, find information on the Internet, and participate in online discussions. Basic instruction in computers or the Internet will not be provided.

Hybrid courses are offered 50% on campus and 50% off-campus via a web-based format.

General Education and Prerequisites

Courses Titles Credits
ENG 101 Composition I 3
ENG 102 Composition II 3
SPCOM 103 Speaking and Listening 3
BIOL 206/L Introduction to Microbiology/Lab 4
BIOL 223/L Anatomy & Physiology I/Lab 4
BIOL 224/L Anatomy & Physiology II/Lab 4
CHEM 111/L Principles of Chemistry/Lab 4
MATH 156 Statistics 3 PSYCH 151
Intro to Human Development 3
History Per Gen. Ed. Requirement 3
Foreign Language 6
Social Science Per Gen. Ed. Requirement 3
__________
TOTAL 43
NSG Courses Titles Credits
NSG 207 Nursing Pathophysiology 3
NSG 208 Basic Pharmacology 3
NSG 231 Introduction to Professional Nursing 2
NSG 232/L Fundamentals of Nursing/Lab 7
NSG 302/L Health Promotion & Assessment/Lab 4
NSG 312/L Nursing Care of Childbearing Families/Lab 6
NSG 322/L Nursing Care of the Adult I/Lab 7
NSG 332/L Pediatric Nursing/Lab 6
NSG 351 Research in Nursing (hybrid) 3
NSG 382/L Psychiatric Nursing/Lab 6
NSG 420/L Nursing Care of the Adult II/Lab 7
NSG 431 Gerontological Nursing (hybrid) 3
NSG 442/L Public Health Nursing/Lab 6
NSG 451 Healthcare Management & Issues (hybrid) 3
NSG 452/L Nursing Process: Synthesis/Lab 8
NSG 471 Healthcare Informatics (hybrid) 3
__________
TOTAL 77

Elective Concentrated Clinical Practicum

The elective concentrated clinical practicum allows the student enrolled in any of the BSN tracks to choose an area of clinical concentration during their progression through the program. The student will meet with their advisor and course coordinator to develop their plan. The plan may include goals to achieve a specific certification. The plan will be approved by the SAFA committee.

Summer - Junior

NSG 372 Clinical Practicum I 3

Spring - Senior

NSG 472 Clinical Practicum II 3

Basic BSN Track Program Plan

Freshman - Fall

Courses Titles Credits
ENG 101 Composition I 3
BIOL 223/L Anatomy & Physiology I/Lab 4
SPCOM 103 Speaking and Listening 3
Foreign Language 3
__________
TOTAL 13

Freshman - Spring

Courses Titles Credits
ENG 102 Composition II 3
BIOL 224/L Anatomy & Physiology II/Lab 4
CHEM 111/L Principles of Chemistry/Lab 4
PSYCH 151 Intro to Human Development 3
__________
TOTAL 14

Sophomore - Fall

Courses Titles Credits
BIOL 206/L Introduction to Microbiology/Lab 4
MATH 156 Statistics 3
Foreign Language 3
SOC Per Gen. Ed. Requirement 3
History Per Gen. Ed. Requirement 3
__________
TOTAL 16

Sophomore - Spring

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 231 Introduction to Professional Nursing 2
NSG 207 Nursing Pathophysiology 3
NSG 208 Basic Pharmacology 3
NSG 232/L Fundamentals of Nursing/Lab 7
__________
TOTAL 15

Junior - Fall

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 302/L Health Promotion & Assessment/Lab 4
NSG 312/L Nursing Care of Childbearing Families/Lab 6
NSG 322/L Nursing Care of the Adult I/Lab 7
__________
TOTAL 17

Junior - Spring

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 332/L Pediatric Nursing/Lab 6
NSG 351 Research in Nursing 3
NSG 382/L Psychiatric Nursing/Lab 6
__________
TOTAL 15

Senior - Fall

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 420/L Nursing Care of the Adult II/Lab 7
NSG 431 Gerontological Nursing 3
NSG 442/L Public Health Nursing/Lab 6
__________
TOTAL 16

Senior - Spring

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 451 Healthcare Management & Issues 3
NSG 452/L Nursing Process: Synthesis/Lab 8
NSG 471 Healthcare Informatics
__________
TOTAL 14

Licensed Practical Nurses Bachelor of Science in Nursing Track (LPN-BSN)

Licensed practical nurses who wish to obtain their Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree may do so through the LPN-BSN track.

LPN-BSN Track Admission Requirements

In addition to the undergraduate program admission requirements, the applicant for this track will:

  • Bring the actual license of certificate to the Department of Nursing for faculty visualization and photocopying prior to the start of the first nursing class.
     
  • Receive seven escrow credit for NSG 232/232L, awarded for LPN credits.

Program of Study

The pre-nursing advisor will meet with the student to plan a program of study for the LPN-BSN track. The course sequencing may change based on student’s program of study developed prior to admission. The program of study will include 43 credit hours of prerequisite courses (see Basic BSN), and 77 credit hours of nursing courses. The licensed practical nurse may transfer in seven nursing escrow credit hours per the articulation agreement. Students must pass all courses with a C or better and maintain a 2.75 nursing GPA to progress.

LPN-BSN Track Program Plan

Prerequisite Courses
(See Basic BSN)

Spring or Summer

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 207 Nursing Pathophysiology 3
NSG 208 Basic Pharmacology 3
NSG 282 LPN Bridge to Professional Nsg 2
_________
TOTAL 8

Junior - Fall

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 302/L Health Promotion & Assessment/Lab 4
NSG 312/L Nursing Care of Childbearing Families/Lab 6
NSG 322/L Nursing Care of the Adult I/Lab 7
__________
TOTAL 17

Junior - Spring

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 332/L Pediatric Nursing/Lab 6
NSG 351 Research in Nursing 3
NSG 382/L Psychiatric Nursing/Lab 6
__________
TOTAL 15

Senior - Fall (Graduation Planning Due)

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 420/L Nursing Care of the Adult II/Lab 7
NSG 431 Gerontological Nursing 3
NSG 442/L Public Health Nursing/Lab 6
__________
TOTAL 16

Senior - Spring

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 451 Healthcare Management & Issues 3
NSG 452/L Nursing Process: Synthesis/Lab 8
NSG 471 Healthcare Informatics 3
__________
TOTAL 14

Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing Track (RN-BSN)

RN-BSN Admissions Requirements

Students must meet basic nursing program admission requirements and for the RN-BSN track which is governed by the “Colorado Articulation Model.” See Basic BSN for after admission requirements. The RN-BSN student applications are taken year round. The student will have a/an:

  • Associate Degree or Diploma.
     
  • Colorado nursing license in good standing.
     
  • Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.750 in nursing prerequisite courses and general education courses.

Program of Study
(one day per week & hybrid)

The student must meet with the RN-BSN advisor to develop a program of study. The program of study is individualized to meet the student’s needs. The program of study may include an accelerated, full-time or part-time sequence. The program of study is designed to assist the working RN in returning to school to complete their BSN. The student may choose from several program plans to meet their busy schedules. The courses are offered one day per week and/or hybrid. Hybrid courses are delivered 50% on web and 50% on campus. This allows the student to be on campus every other week for specific courses (see below). The RN-BSN track will include 33 credit hours of transfer/escrow credits through the articulation agreement, 43 credit hours of prerequisite or co-requisite courses (see Basic BSN) and 44 credit hours of nursing and upper division credit for a total of 120 credit hours. Students must pass all courses with a C or better and maintain a 2.75 GPA. RN’s transferring from community colleges can only transfer in 27 prerequisite credits along with 33 RN credits for a total of 60 credit hours.

Nursing Transfer/Escrow 33
Prerequisite Courses 43
(See Basic BSN or Program Plan)

Traditional Courses

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 302/L Health Promotion & Assessment/Lab 4
NSG 307 Health and Disease Systems 3 NSG 442/L Public Health Nursing/Lab 6
Upper division elective 3

Hybrid Courses (50% on campus and 50% online)

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 309 Professional Nursing Practice 4
NSG 311 Concepts for Professional Nsg 4
NSG 351 Research in Nursing 3
NSG 431 Gerontological Nursing 3
NSG 451 Healthcare Management & Issues 3
NSG 452/L Nursing Process: Synthesis/Lab (RN Section only) 8
NSG 471 Healthcare Informatics 3

RN-BSN Track Program Plan

Prerequisite Courses
(See Basic BSN)

Fall - Junior

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 302/L Health Promotion & Assessment/Lab 4
NSG 309 Professional Nursing Practice 4
_________
TOTAL 8

Spring - Junior

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 307 Health and Disease Systems 3
NSG 311 Concepts for Professional Nsg. 4
NSG 351 Research in Nursing 3
__________
TOTAL 10

Fall - Senior

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 431 Gerontological Nursing 3
NSG 442/L Public Health Nursing/Lab 6
Upper division elective 3
__________
TOTAL 12

Spring - Senior

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 451 Healthcare Management & Issues 3
NSG 452/L Nursing Process: Synthesis/Lab 8
NSG 471 Healthcare Informatics 3
__________
TOTAL 14

The Accelerated Option for Registered Nurse to Bachelor of Science in Nursing Track (RN-BSN)

The RN-to-BSN Track Accelerated Option enables registered nurses to make the transition to professional nursing with a baccalaureate degree in three consecutive semesters. The associate degree nurse can complete their bachelor’s degree starting in the summer and finishing their nursing courses by the next spring. Prerequisite courses must be completed prior to admission to this track. Courses are delivered in a hybrid fashion allowing the student to take part of the course through the web, and part of the course through on-site instruction. Clinical components of this track allow the student to essentially complete their clinical experiences in their hometown.

Summer

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 302/L Health Promotion & Assessment/Lab 4
NSG 307 Health and Disease Systems 3
NSG 309 Professional Nursing Practice 4
NSG 311 Concepts for Professional Nsg. 4
NSG 351 Research in Nursing 3
__________
TOTAL 18

Fall

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 431 Gerontology 3
NSG 442/L Public Health Nursing/Lab 6
Upper division elective 3
__________
TOTAL 12

Spring

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 451 Healthcare Management & Issues 3
NSG 452/L Nursing Process: Synthesis/Lab 8
NSG 471 Healthcare Informatics 3
__________
TOTAL 14

Degree Plus to BSN Nursing Accelerated Track

The Nursing Department’s belief of creating a generalist able to function as a professional in today’s workforce enables the department to individually assess the student with a degree other than nursing in order to grant credit for courses taken.

The Degree-Plus Accelerated Option is for students with a previous non-nursing baccalaureate degree. The applicant must have completed the necessary prerequisites prior to starting the program. The Accelerated Option offers students an intense, challenging approach that enables students to complete the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree in 14 months.

Previous coursework necessary for admission to the Accelerated Option includes the natural, social, and behavioral sciences. Most students in their previous degree may have completed most of the prerequisites required. During the Accelerated year, students participate in a reality based curriculum that includes classroom, Internet, and real life clinical experiences in state-of-the-art facilities.

The belief is that a student with a previous degree has moved from simple to more complex use of theories/experiences either in their educational and/or work environments. This and use of multi theoretical frameworks is congruent with the Nursing Department’s philosophy.

The degree-plus student is expected to meet with the pre-nursing advisor for advisement and plan development. The student must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 and follow all admission requirements set forth in the Basic Nursing Track. A minimum of 30 credit hours must be taken at CSU-Pueblo or more based on the students plan. Due to the intensity of the curriculum, it is advised that the student not work and be able to attend to their studies full-time. Students must maintain a cumulative nursing 3.0 GPA to progress.

Prerequisite Courses Credits
BIOL 206/L Introduction to Microbiology/Lab 4
BIOL 223/L Anatomy & Physiology I/Lab 4
BIOL 224/L Anatomy & Physiology II/Lab 4
CHEM 111/L Principles of Chemistry/Lab 4
MATH 156 Statistics 3
PSYCH 151 Intro to Human Development 3
Foreign Language 6
__________
TOTAL 28

Degree Plus to BSN Nursing Accelerated Track Program Plan

Summer

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 208 Basic Pharmacology 3
NSG 231 Introduction to Nursing 2
NSG 232/L Fundamentals of Nursing/Lab 7
NSG 302/L Health Promotion & Assessment/Lab 4
NSG 307 Health & Disease Systems 3
__________
TOTAL 19

Fall

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 322/L Nursing Care of the Adult I/Lab 7
NSG 332/L Pediatric Nursing/Lab 6
NSG 420/L Nursing Care of the Adult II/Lab 7
__________
TOTAL 20

Spring

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 312/L Nursing Care of Childbearing Families/Lab 6
NSG 351 Research in Nursing 3
NSG 382/L Psychiatric Nursing/Lab 6
NSG 451 Healthcare Management & Issues 3
__________
TOTAL 18

Summer

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 431 Gerontological Nursing 3
NSG 442/L Public Health Nursing/Lab 6
NSG 452/L Nursing Process: Synthesis/Lab 8
NSG 471 Healthcare Informatics 3
__________
TOTAL 20

Paramedic to Bachelor in Nursing (Paramedic-BSN) Track

Then Nursing Department’s belief of creating a generalist able to function as a professional nurse in today’s workforce enables the department to individually assess the student with another degree other than nursing in order to grant credit for courses taken.

The Paramedic to BSN track allows the paramedic who has graduated from an accredited program to complete their BSN and have the option of completing their MS in a seamless track. The applicant must have completed the necessary prerequisite courses prior to starting the program. The Accelerated Option offers students an intense, challenging approach that enables students to complete the Masters of Science with a Major in Nursing degree and along the way complete their BSN, sit for the NCLEX examination for licensure, and graduate with an Acute Care Nurse Practitioner or MS track of their choice in three years.

Previous coursework necessary for admission to the Paramedic to BSN includes the natural, social, and behavioral sciences. Most students in their previous degree may have completed most of the prerequisites required. The students participate in a reality-based curriculum that includes classroom, internet, and real life clinical experiences in state-of-the-art facilities.

The belief is that a student moves from simple to more complex in their use of theories/experiences either in their education and/or work environments. This belief and use of multi theoretical frameworks is congruent with the Nursing Department’s philosophy.

The student is expected to meet with a nursing advisor for advisement and plan development. The student will then be assigned an advisor. The student must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 and follow all admission requirements set forth in the Basic Nursing Track. A minimum of 30 credit hours must be taken at CSU-Pueblo or more based on the students plan. Due to the intensity of the curriculum, it is advised that the student not work and be able to attend to their studies full-time.

Prerequisite and General Education Courses

(**Depending on the students program they may have completed most of these prerequisites.)

Courses Titles Credits
ENG 101 Composition I 3
ENG 102 Composition II 3
SPCOM 103 Speaking and Listening 3
BIOL 206/L Introduction to Microbiology/Lab 4
BIOL 223/L Anatomy & Physiology I/Lab 4
BIOL 224/L Anatomy & Physiology II/Lab 4
CHEM 111/L Principles of Chemistry/Lab 4

MATH 156 Statistics 3
PSYCH 151 Intro to Human Development 3
History Per Gen. Ed. Requirement 3
Foreign Language 6
Social Science Per Gen. Ed. Requirement 3
__________
TOTAL 43

Course Sequencing

Summer

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 208 Basic Pharmacology 3
NSG 231 Introduction to Professional Nsg 2
NSG 232/L Fundamentals of Nursing/Lab 7
NSG 302/L Health Promotion & Assessment/Lab 4
NSG 307 Health & Disease Systems 3
__________
TOTAL 19

Fall

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 322/L Nursing Care of the Adult I/Lab 7
NSG 332/L Pediatric Nursing/Lab 6
NSG 420/L Nursing Care of the Adult II/Lab 7
__________
TOTAL 20

Spring

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 312/L Nursing Care of Childbearing Families/Lab 6
NSG 351 Research in Nursing (hybrid) 3
NSG 382/L Psychiatric Nursing/Lab 6
NSG 451 Healthcare Management & Issues 3
__________
TOTAL 18

Summer

Courses Titles Credits
NSG 431 Gerontological Nursing 3
NSG 442/L Public Health Nursing/Lab 6
NSG 452/L Nursing Process: Synthesis/Lab 8
NSG 471 Healthcare Informatics 3
__________
TOTAL 20

Masters of Science Courses Taken By Seniors

Undergraduate nursing students may elect to take nursing graduate courses during their senior year. The policies are outlined in the Graduate Program section of this catalog.

TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM

Dr. Victoria Marquesen: Associate Dean
Faculty: Piazza, Ramirez, Ryan,

Mission of the Teacher Education

The Teacher Education Program has a primary mission of preparing teachers of quality and distinction. At Colorado State University-Pueblo, preparing teachers is a campus-wide responsibility, with faculty and administrators involved in support of the program’s mission. An integral component of the program is its formal partnership with 17 school districts and four community colleges in southern and southeastern Colorado. The joint efforts of students, faculty, and administrators across all partners focus on improving the quality of learning in classrooms in elementary, secondary, and higher education.

Conceptual Framework—Building and Bridging Communities of Learners

A Conceptual Framework is a guide for how a teacher education program is planned and organized, summarizing its philosophical views of the roles of teaching and learning and its essential understandings of how students become teachers. The conceptual framework of teacher education at Colorado State University-Pueblo is Building and Bridging Communities of Learners. The organizing theme of learning communities focuses the attention of faculty and students on the essential nature of teaching and learning: How does community shape learning and achievement? What are the roles of successful learners and teachers? What social interactions are necessary for both learning and community? How is the definition of a learning community changing in an increasingly technological age? What is the relationship between the concept of learning community and the democratic ideal of American education?

For faculty at CSU-Pueblo, the vision of quality education requires a learner-centered environment in which learning (not teaching) is at the core. All learners will achieve in communities in which learning is publicly and constructively discussed, a positive climate surrounds all members, and support exists for all learners’ individual growth and development.

Inclusive, equitable communities require constant attention to the nature of relationships among teachers and students. CSU-Pueblo students will be prepared to participate as learners and teachers in overlapping and expanding learning communities–from the University classroom to K-12 settings, the professional education community, distributed communities created by technology, and cultural, economic, and political communities of students and their families.

To become beginning teachers, students must change their perceptions of themselves as learners and as students of teaching. As students progress through the program, they will skillfully assume a variety of roles, including those of master learners, instructors, collaborators, apprentices, models, coaches, colleagues, and mentors. It is the mission of the teacher education program to prepare teachers and learners of quality and distinction by exposing students to quality communities of teaching and learning.

Program Goals

  • Prepare teachers of quality and distinction with broad-based liberal arts education, depth of knowledge in the areas in which they teach, and the ability to skillfully translate theory and practice to ensure student learning.
     
  • Create a learner-centered community designed to achieve program goals and expected student results.
     
  • Provide systematic advising and evaluation activities which assure student success and program quality.
     
  • Serve the region and state of Colorado through partnerships with school districts and institutions of higher education.

Student Outcomes

The Teacher Education Program is a standards-based model of education. Student outcomes are the foundation of the program, upon which the curriculum, instruction, and assessment are aligned and implemented. Based on its mission to produce teachers of quality and distinction, the program has adopted goals in eight areas. Each goal has been articulated into a series of performance-based standards or outcomes that all students must achieve before completing the program. Benchmarks, or more specific outcomes, for each standard have been developed as course objectives throughout the program, and faculty across campus have organized course requirements and assignments to assure that students can meet these standards at high levels.

Standards are aligned with the Performance-based Standards for Colorado Teachers (2000) and requirements of the Colorado Department of Education and Colorado Commission on Higher Education. Proficiency in all standards is required for successful completion of teacher education and recommendation for state licensure.

Teacher Education Goals

CSU-Pueblo teacher education graduates will:

  1. Use democratic principles to create communities of learners that assure positive social interactions, collaboration, and cooperation.
     
  2. Create learning experiences that make content knowledge accessible, exciting, and meaningful for all students.
     
  3. Create a learning community in which individual differences are respected, appreciated, and celebrated.
     
  4. Ensure, through the use of standards and informal and formal assessment activities, the continuous development of all learners.
     
  5. Construct and use pedagogy to maximize the intellectual, social, physical, and moral development of all students.
     
  6. Be reflective decision-makers, incorporating understandings of educational history, philosophy, and inquiry, as will as the values of the democratic ideal.
     
  7. Create communities of learning by working collaboratively with colleagues, families, and other members.
     
  8. Model the professional and ethical responsibilities of the education profession.

Teaching Endorsement Areas

The Teacher Education Program collaborates with other academic units to offer programs leading to Colorado teacher licensure in the following endorsement areas:

  • Art (K-12)
  • Elementary Education (K-6)
  • English (7-12)
  • Foreign Languages (7-12) –Spanish
  • Mathematics (7-12)
  • Music (K-12)
  • Physical Education (K-12)
  • Science (7-12)
  • Social Studies (7-12)

Selective Entry and Retention in Teacher Education Admission

Many education courses require the prerequisite of admission to education (see description of courses). Students complete the admission to education process during ED 301: Frameworks of Teaching. The entire process for gathering information and submitting it to faculty is completed during the course.

The following are the requirements that must be met to be admitted to teacher education. No exceptions can occur to these requirements:

  1. Complete Health Clearance Form
     
  2. Cumulative grade point of 2.600 or greater.
     
  3. Completion of ENG 101 and 102 with grades of C- or better.
     
  4. Completion of MATH 109 or math course required by major field. A grade of B or better is required in MATH 109 or MATH 360; a grade of C or better is required in MATH 121, 124, 126, or 221. Students who complete both MATH 109 and MATH 156 or MATH 360 and MATH 361 prior to admission may be admitted with grades of C or better in both courses.
     
  5. Completion of SPCOM 103 with a grade of B- or better, or, students completing SPCOM 103 with a C- or degree plus students may complete this competency through the Oral Proficiency Exam.
     
  6. Completion of ED 301 with a grade of C- or better.
     
  7. Completion of a formal, standardized test such as the Academic Profile and a writing sample.
     
  8. Completion of satisfactory background check with the Colorado Bureau of Investigation. Background check is sent to the Colorado Department of Education and report must meet the criteria required for obtaining a teaching license in Colorado.
     
  9. Completion of an education portfolio. Six types of materials will be submitted with the portfolio: 1) transcripts and official documents demonstrating students performance in University classes, 2) materials developed in University classes which demonstrate proficiency on specific education standards, 3) recommendations and evaluations from teachers, 4) materials used in field experiences and videos of teaching, 5) personal reflections and summaries about progress, and 6) results of formal tests. Specific portfolio requirements and manner of evaluation are included in the appendices to the Teacher Education Handbook. All portfolios will be submitted in electronic format (website).

Retention

Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.600 and must continue to make progress towards proficiency on program standards to remain in the teacher education program. Additional details related to program retention are included in the Teacher Education Handbook.

Student Teaching

Student teaching provides opportunities to integrate theory with practice. Prior to being approved for a student teaching assignment, the following requirements must be met:

  1. Completion of all course work including courses in the content area and education.
     
  2. Cumulative GPA of 2.600.
     
  3. GPA of 2.500 in the academic major.
     
  4. Grades of C- or higher in all courses required for licensure.
     
  5. Passing score on the content exam in the student’s licensure area, required by the State of Colorado.
     
  6. Completion of an education portfolio. Six types of materials will be submitted with the portfolio: 1) transcripts and official documents demonstrating students performance in University classes, 2) materials developed in University classes which demonstrate proficiency on specific education standards. 3) recommendations and evaluations from teachers, 4) materials used in field experience and videos of teaching, and 5) personal reflections and summaries about progress. Specific portfolio requirements and manner of evaluation are included in the appendices to the Teacher Education Handbook. All portfolios will be submitted in electronic format (website).

Applications must be submitted a semester in advance: First Friday in October for a spring semester assignment; first Friday in March for a fall semester assignment.

Student teaching requires full time effort, therefore students may not enroll in University courses other than Student Teaching and Capstone Seminar.

Teacher Licensure

Applications for licensure are forwarded to the Colorado Department of Education (CDE) with the institutional recommendation only after official transcripts have been received and the Teacher Education Program has conducted a final review.

Specific Requirements for the Elementary Teaching Endorsement

CSU-Pueblo requires the student interested in Elementary Education to complete a Liberal Studies major in addition to the courses in Education listed below.

Courses Titles Credits
ED 202 Foundations of Education 3
PREREQUISITES- None
       
ED 280 Educational Media and Technology 3
PREREQUISITES- None
       
ED 301 Frameworks of Teaching 3
PREREQUISITES- Completion of 45 college hours and a cumulative GPA of 2.6 (Admission to Education is completed in this course)
       
ED 380 Integrated Methods in Elem. School 3
PREREQUISITES- Admission to Education; GPA of 2.6
       
RDG 410 Teaching Elementary Language Arts 4
PREREQUISITES- Admission to Education; GPA of 2.6
ED 412 Teaching Diverse Learners 3
PREREQUISITES- Admission to Education; GPA of 2.6
       
ED 413 Teaching Social Studies 3
PREREQUISITES-Admission to Education; GPA of 2.6
       
ED 414 Teaching Elementary Science & Health 2
PREREQUISITES-Admission to Education; GPA of 2.6
       
ED 417 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School 2
PREREQUISITES-Admission to Education: GPA of 2.6; Completion of Liberal Studies Math Block.
       
ED 485 Capstone Seminar 2
PREREQUISITES-Admission to Student Teaching. Must be taken with student teaching
       
ED 487 Student Teaching in the Elementary School 12
PREREQUISITES- Admission to Student Teaching

Specific Requirements for the Secondary and K-12 Teaching Endorsements

The student must complete an appropriate major and the following Education courses:

Courses Titles Credits
PSYCH 151   Human Development 3
 PREREQUISITES-None
       
ED 202 Foundations of Education 3
PREREQUISITES-None
       
ED 280 Educational Media and Technology 3
ED 301 Frameworks of Teaching 3
(Admission to Education is completed in this course PREREQUISITES-Completion of 45 college hours and a cumulative GPA of 2.6
       
PSYCH 342 Educational Psychology 3
PREREQUISITES-PSYCH 151
       
RDG 435 Content Area Literacy 4
PREREQUISITES-Admission to Education; GPA of 2.6
   
Special Methods in Endorsement Areas 4-9
PREREQUISITES-Admission to Education; GPA of 2.6
       
ED 412 Teaching Diverse Learners* 3
PREREQUISITES-Admission to Education: GPA of 2.6
       
ED 485 Capstone Seminar 2
PREREQUISITES-Admission to Student Teaching. Must be taken with student teaching.
       
ED 488/489 Secondary Student Teaching/Student Teaching K-12 12
PREREQUISITES-Admission to Student Teaching
____________
TOTAL 37-42

*Physical Education students complete EXHP 465, Adaptive Physical Education.

Performance Assessment Activities

In the Teacher Education Program, performance assessment is a process that documents the relationship between the stated mission, goals, program standards, and actual student outcomes. Assessment is multidimensional and comprehensive, utilizing a variety of quantitative and qualitative measures.

  • Assessment of student progress is frequent and ongoing throughout the program. At three points in the student’s program, faculty completes a multidimensional assessment of progress on teacher education program standards: at admission to education, admission to student teaching, and during student teaching. These assessments include a review of progress in all courses, evaluation of student performance through a student-constructed portfolio, and review of K-12 teachers’ evaluation of student performance in field experiences.
     
  • Evaluation of progress occurs at the end of each semester after admission to education through a review of student performance in University classes and field experiences.
     
  • Student records are maintained in the Teacher Education Office.

READING PROGRAM

Reading Minor

The reading minor is intended for elementary, secondary, or K-12 teacher certification candidates who wish to have a recognized area of strength in the teaching of reading and other language arts.

Expected Student Outcomes

As a result of successfully completing the reading minor, the student must be able to:

  • Recognize, describe, diagnose, and teach all the generally accepted concepts, strategies and skills in the areas of oral language, reading readiness, emergent literacy, word recognition, comprehension, interpretation, literary appreciation, reading for information, critical reading and thinking, reference skills, study skills, oral reading, listening, speaking, English language usage, syntax, grammar, punctuation, capitalization, creative and informative writing, spelling and penmanship;
     
  • Describe the role and importance of the child’s self-concept, experience and culture, home language and dialect, stages of growth and development, and success and familiarity with literature as factors in motivating growth in reading and the language arts;
     
  • Plan lessons and teach effectively using a variety of grouping techniques, including whole class, individual, ability, and cooperative;
     
  • Locate and use a variety of materials to teach reading and the other language arts. The materials include textbooks, basal readers, trade and library books, teacher-made materials, computer programs, student-generated texts, centers, newspapers, and children’s literature;
     
  • Diagnose student reading levels and specific strengths and weaknesses, organize instruction to provide for the needs of the class and individual special students, adapt instruction in content areas to promote content learning, and develop reading and writing growth for all students;
     
  • Recognize common causes of reading and writing difficulties and administer and interpret the scores of a variety of informal assessment techniques such as reading miscue inventories and norm-referenced standardized tests;
     
  • Assess writing samples for diagnosis and prescription in expression, organization, fluency, sentence and paragraph development, theme, spelling, penmanship and fluency in work processing; and
     
  • Explain the need to collaborate with parents, librarians, drama and other teachers to provide an effective language arts program.

Specific Requirements

Students must complete the reading core with a GPA of 3.00 or better and complete the reading electives with a cumulative GPA of 2.60 or better. RDG 301 or 425 are prerequisites for other reading courses. The minor requires completion of a minimum of 22 hours, 14 from core courses and 8 hours chosen from available electives with consultation with an education advisor. Many electives are available only in summer sessions.

Core Course Requirements

Courses Titles Credits
ENG 351/412 Children’s Literature/Adolescent Literature 2
RDG 301* Teaching Reading and Language Arts in the Elementary School 3
RDG 310 Current Approaches to Reading and Writing Instruction 3
RDG 425** Teaching Reading in the Content Areas 3
RDG 450 Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Problems 3
___________
CORE TOTAL 14

Eight credits of Electives from the following list: 8

Courses Titles Credits
RDG 360 Practicum 1-3
RDG 431 Developing Creative Centers 1
RDG 436 New Directions in Reading Comprehension 2
RDG 437 Teaching with Newspapers as a Resource 1
RDG 442 Reading Across Cultures 2
RDG 491 Topics in Reading 1-2
ED 412/461 Teaching Diverse Learners/Atypical Students in the Secondary School 3
  Core Total 14
  Electives Required  8
___________________
  Total Required 22

* RDG 410 Teaching Reading and Language Arts (4 hours) may replace RDG 301

**RDG 435 Area Content Literacy (4 hours) may replace RDG 425

Higher Education Act (HEA) Reporting Requirements

In October 1998, Congress enacted Title II of the Higher Education Act (HEA), requiring new reporting requirements for institutions and states on teacher preparation and licensing. Section 207 of Title II requires the annual preparation and submission of a report by each university that prepares teachers on how well individuals who complete its teacher preparation program perform on initial state licensing and certification assessments in their areas of specialization. Universities are also required to publish information on basic aspects of their programs, such as number of students, amount of required supervised practice teaching, and the student-faculty ratio in supervised practice teaching. On the next page is information on students who completed CSU-Pueblo’s teacher education program during 2004-2005.

Required Program/Supplementary
Material

 
S.1 Total number of students admitted into teacher preparation, all specializations, in Academic year 2004-2005 340 S.6A The average number of student teaching hours per week required 40
S.2 Number of students in supervised student teaching in academic year 2004-2005 81 S.6B The total number of weeks of supervised student teaching required 15
Number of faculty members who supervised student teachers:   S.7 Average total number of hours required 600
S.3A Full-time faculty in professional education 3 S.8. Is your teacher preparation program currently approved or accredited by the state?
__X__ Yes _____ No
S.3B Part-time faculty in professional education but full-time in the institution 2 S.9. Is your teacher preparation program currently under a designation as “low-performing” by the state)?
_____ Yes __X__ No
S.3C Part-time faculty in professional education, not otherwise employed by the institution 13
S.4 Total faculty student teaching supervisors 18  
S.5 Student teacher/faculty ratio 4.5

Colorado State University-Pueblo


One hundred percent of all CSU-Pueblo students passed the required licensure exam prior to their student teaching in 2004-2005. Statistics below only consider program completers who took and passed the PLACE exams. In Colorado, students in Elementary Education, English, Math, Science, and Social Studies may complete either the PLACE or PRAXIS exams, and many CSU-Pueblo students do complete the PRAXIS. Students listed as not passing in the table or whose scores are not reflected in the table took the PRAXIS and passed
 
Academic Year: 2004-2005 Testing Period: 9/04-8/05  
     

 

  Institution Institution Institution Statewide
           
Test Field/Category   Number Tested Number Passed Pass Rate Pass Rate
           

028  Art

  3 -- -- 99%

001           Elementary Education

  39 32 82% 87%

007           English

  4 -- -- 95%

004           Mathematics

  5 -- -- 98%

029           Music

  4 -- -- 96%

032           Physical Education

  12 12 100% 98%

006           Social Studies

  5 -- -- 84%

009           Spanish

  2 -- -- 98%
           

Aggregate

  74 65 88% 92%
           

Summary Totals and Pass Rate

  74 65 88% 93%
           
           

Note: Pass rates for content areas with fewer than 10 students taking the test are not included per the “Rule of 10”       described in the Reference and Reporting Guide, page II.