CSU-Pueblo Alumni Association

Annual Events

Annual Diversity Resource Center Events

Hispanic Heritage Month Events
In September 1968, Congress authorized President Lyndon B. Johnson to proclaim National Hispanic Heritage Week. The observance was expanded in 1988 to a month long celebration (Sept. 15 - Oct. 15). America celebrates the culture and traditions of U.S. residents who trace their roots to Spain, Mexico and the Spanish-speaking nations of Central America, South America and the Caribbean. Sept. 15 was chosen as the starting point for the celebration because it is the anniversary of independence of five Latin American countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on Sept. 16 and Sept. 18, respectively. (Courtesy of U.S. Census Bureau)

National Disability Employment Awareness Month Events

Congress designated each October as National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM). The Office of Disability Employment Policy has the lead in planning NDEAM activities and materials to increase the public's awareness of the contributions and skills of American workers with disabilities. Various programs carried out throughout the month also highlight the specific employment barriers that still need to be addressed and removed.
This effort to educate the American public about issues related to disability and employment actually began in 1945, when Congress enacted a law declaring the first week in October each year "National Employ the Physically Handicapped Week." In 1962, the word "physically" was removed to acknowledge the employment needs and contributions of individuals with all types of disabilities. In 1988, Congress expanded the week to a month and changed the name to "National Disability Employment Awareness Month."  (Courtesy of Office of Disability Employment Policy).

LBGT Awareness Events

LGBT History Month originated in the United States and was first celebrated in 1994. It was founded by Missouri high-school history teacher Rodney Wilson. In 1995, the National Education Association indicated support of LGBT History Month as well as other history months by resolution at its General Assembly.  Gay and Lesbian Pride Month is celebrated each year for the month of June. The last Sunday in June is celebrated as Gay Pride Day. On June 2, 2000, President Bill Clinton declared June "Gay & Lesbian Pride Month." U.S. President Barack Obama declared June 2010 to be Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month, stating, “I call upon all Americans to observe this month by fighting prejudice and discrimination in their own lives and everywhere it exists.” The month was chosen to commemorate the 1969 Stonewall riots in Greenwich Village that sparked the modern LGBT liberation movement in the United States. (Courtesy of Wikipedia)

Black History Month Events

Black History Month actually started as Negro History Week in 1926 by Carter G. Woodson. The goal of Black History Week was to educate the American people about African-Americans' cultural backgrounds and reputable achievement.  Since 1976, it is celebrated annually in the United States of America in February.  In the U.S., Black History Month is also referred to as African-American History Month. (Courtesy of Wikipedia)

Women’s History Month Events

An annual declared month worldwide that highlights contributions of women to events in history and contemporary society. March has been set aside as this month in the United States. The event traces its beginnings back to the first International Women's Day in 1911. In 1979, the school district of Sonoma, California, participated in Women's History Week, an event designed around the week of March 8 (International Women's Day).
In 1981, responding to the growing popularity of the event, the United States Congress passed a resolution recognizing Women's History Week. This week was well received, and soon after, schools across the country began to have their own local celebrations. The next year, leaders from the California group shared their project at the Women's History Institute at Sarah Lawrence College. Other participants not only became determined to begin their own local Women's History Week projects, but also agreed to support an effort to have Congress declare a national Women's History Month. In 1987 Congress expanded the focus to a whole month. (Courtesy of Wikipedia)

Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast

This federal holiday honoring the civil rights leader is observed on the third Monday in January. It is observed on the third Monday of January each year, which is around the time of King's birthday, January 15. The floating holiday is similar to holidays set under the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, though the act predated the establishment of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day by fifteen years.

Re-Thinking Diversity Series

A series of discussions that invite a faculty or staff member to present of various topics throughout the semester on contemporary issues related to diversity in their perspective fields.  The focus of the series is on the significance and impact of diversity or multiculturalism in the global arena.